Skip to main content
ARS Home » Northeast Area » Boston, Massachusetts » Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #332425

Research Project: Cardiovascular Nutrition and Health

Location: Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging

Title: Levels of adipocytokines and vitamin D in a biracial sample of young metabolically healthy obese and metabolically abnormal obese women

Author
item Camhi, Sarah - University Of Massachusetts
item You, Tongjian - University Of Massachusetts
item Hayman, Laura - University Of Massachusetts
item Must, Aviva - Tufts University
item Lichtenstein, Alice - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University

Submitted to: Circulation
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/1/2016
Publication Date: 4/26/2016
Citation: Camhi, S.M., You, T., Hayman, L.L., Must, A., Lichtenstein, A.H. 2016. Levels of adipocytokines and vitamin D in a biracial sample of young metabolically healthy obese and metabolically abnormal obese women. Circulation. 133:AP301.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Purpose: Adipocytokines and vitamin D (vitD) concentrations may contribute to cardiometabolic risk profiles in obese populations. The purpose was to determine if levels of adipocytokines and vitD differ between young metabolically healthy obese (MHO) and metabolically abnormal obese (MAO) black and white women. Methods: Project Health included 46 overweight/obese young women (BMI >/=25 kg/m2, age=19-35 years, 61% Black). Women were classified as MHO (<2 abnormal cardiometabolic risk factors) or MAO (>/=2 abnormal cardiometabolic risk factors) based on: blood pressure >/=130/85 mmHg; triglycerides >/=150 mg/dL; HDL C <50 mg/dL; glucose >/=100 mg/dL; CRP >/=90th %tile; HOMA IR >/=90th %tile). Serum levels of high sensitivity C reactive protein (CRP) were measured by an immunoturbidimetric assay; levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) by an electrochemiluminescence immunoassay; adiponectin by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (vitD) by a radioimmunoassay. Total body fat was measured by dual x-ray absorptiometry. Pearson correlations were used to calculate the associations between body fat and serum measures. T-tests and linear regression (adjusting for race and body fat) were used to examine differences between MHO and MAO. Results: Compared to MAO, MHO (n=37; 80%) had lower BMI values (MHO: 30.5 +/- 3.5; MAO: 34.3 +/- 3.9 kg/m2, p=0.004), but there were no significant differences in body fat (mean in total sample: 45.3 +/- 6.2%). CRP was significantly associated with body fat (%) in MAO (r=0.78, p=0.007), but not MHO. Other adipocytokines and vitD were not significantly correlated with body fat; none of these associations were significant in MHO. T-tests revealed that compared to MHO, MAO had significantly higher CRP levels (log mg/L MHO: 0.82 +/- 1.2 vs. MAO 1.8 +/- 0.9, p=0.01); and significantly lower adiponectin levels (log ng/mL MHO: 9.7 +/- 0.5 vs. MAO 9.0 +/- 0.3; p=0.0004). There were no significant differences between MHO and MAO in IL-6, TNF-alpha or VitD levels. These differences remain significant even after adjusting for race and body fat in linear regression. Conclusion: Compared to MHO, young women who are MAO have higher levels of CRP and lower levels of adiponectin even after controlling for potential confounders. Our findings suggest that chronic inflammation plays an important role in the mechanism of abnormal cardiometabolic risk as it differentiates young MHO and MAO women