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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Logan, Utah » Poisonous Plant Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #332051

Research Project: Understanding and Mitigating the Adverse Effects of Poisonous Plants on Livestock Production Systems

Location: Poisonous Plant Research

Title: Conditioned food aversion to control outbreaks of intoxication by Ipomoea carnea and Turbina cordata in goats

Author
item Pimentel, Luciano - Veterinary Hospital, Federal University Of Campina Grande (UFCG)
item Maia, Lisanka - Veterinary Hospital, Federal University Of Campina Grande (UFCG)
item Campos, Edipo - Veterinary Hospital, Federal University Of Campina Grande (UFCG)
item Dantas, Antonio - Veterinary Hospital, Federal University Of Campina Grande (UFCG)
item Medeiros, Rosane - Veterinary Hospital, Federal University Of Campina Grande (UFCG)
item Pfister, James - Jim
item Cook, Daniel
item Riet-correa, Franklin - Veterinary Hospital, Federal University Of Campina Grande (UFCG)

Submitted to: Pesquisa Veterinaria Brasileira
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/28/2012
Publication Date: 8/1/2012
Publication URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/5399137
Citation: Pimentel, L.A., Maia, L.A., Campos, E.M., Dantas, A.F., Medeiros, R.M., Pfister, J.A., Cook, D., Riet-Correa, F. 2012. Conditioned food aversion to control outbreaks of intoxication by Ipomoea carnea and Turbina cordata in goats. Pesquisa Veterinaria Brasileira. 32(8):707-714. http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S0100-736X2012000800005.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1590/S0100-736X2012000800005

Interpretive Summary: Conditioned food aversion is used to train livestock to avoid the ingestion of toxic plants. This technique was used to control Turbina cordata poisoning in goats in one Brazilian farm, and to control Ipomoea carnea subsp. fistulosa poisoning in another farm. The goats were penned at night and the next morning the green plants were offered for 10 minutes. Goats that ingested any amount of the plant were treated through a gastric tube with 175mg of LiCl/kg body weight. In the flock in which the poisoning by T. cordata was occurring, the goats were averted every two months during the period that the plant was found in the pastures. During the experiment, from December 2009 to April 2011, new cases of poisoning were not observed, and there was a progressive decrease in the number of goats that ingested the plant and were averted. In the farm where I. carnea poisoning was occurring, most of the goats were averted in December 2010, 15-20 days before the first rains. The goats of this flock did not ingest the plant spontaneously in the field until September-October 2011, when, due to the dry season, there was a severe forage shortage, and the goats started to ingest the plant in the field. Later, despite three aversive treatments with 21 days intervals, the goats continued to ingest the plant and some animals became poisoned. In conclusion, conditioned food aversion was effective in controlling intoxication by T. cordata. The technique was also effective in conditioning goats to avoid consuming I. carnea during the rainy season, but not during the dry season, with low forage availability in the field. The differences in these results seem to be due to the epidemiology of both poisonings: T. cordata is senescent and unavailable during most of the dry period, and green biomass is typically available either at the very end of the dry season, for a short period of time, and during the rainy season when there is no shortage of forage. In contrast, I. carnea grows in wet areas near water sources, and stays green during the dry period when there is a lack of other forage.

Technical Abstract: Conditioned food aversion is used to train livestock to avoid the ingestion of toxic plants. This technique was used to control Turbina cordata poisoning in goats in one farm, and to control Ipomoea carnea subsp. istulosa poisoning in another farm. The goats were penned at night and the next morning the green plants were offered for 10 minutes. Goats that ingested any amount of the plant were treated through a gastric tube with 175mg of LiCl/kg body weight. In the lock in which the poisoning by T. cordata was occurring, the goats were averted every two months during the period that the plant was found in the pastures. During the experiment, from December 2009 to April 2011, new cases of poisoning were not observed, and there was a progressive decrease in the number of goats that ingested the plant and were averted. In the farm where I. carnea poisoning was occurring, most of the goats were averted in December 2010, 15-20 days before the first rains. The goats of this lock did not ingest the plant spontaneously in the ield until September-October 2011, when, due to the dry season, there was a severe forage shortage, and the goats started to ingest the plant in the field. Later, despite three aversive treatments with 21 days intervals, the goats continued to ingest the plant and some animals became poisoned. In conclusion, conditioned food aversion was effective in to control intoxication by T. cordata. The technique was also effective in conditioning goats to avoid consuming I. carnea during the rainy season, but not during the dry season, with low forage availability in the ield. The differences in these results seem to be due to the epidemiology of both poisonings: T. cordata is senescent and unavailable during most of the dry period, and green biomass is typically available either at the very end of the dry season, for a short period of time, and during the rainy season when there is no shortage of forage. In contrast, I. carnea grows in wet areas near water sources, and stays green during the dry period when there is a lack of other forage.