Skip to main content
ARS Home » Northeast Area » Boston, Massachusetts » Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #331860

Research Project: Phytochemicals and Healthy Aging

Location: Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging

Title: Bioavailability and biodistribution of nanodelivered lutein

Author
item Kamil, Alison - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University
item Smith, Donald - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University
item Blumberg, Jeffrey - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University
item Astete, Carlos - Louisiana State University
item Sabliov, Cristina - Louisiana State University
item Chen, Chung-yen - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University

Submitted to: Food Chemistry
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/22/2015
Publication Date: 2/1/2016
Citation: Kamil, A., Smith, D.E., Blumberg, J.B., Astete, C., Sabliov, C., Chen, C. 2016. Bioavailability and biodistribution of nanodelivered lutein. Food Chemistry. 192:915-923. doi: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2015.07.106.

Interpretive Summary: Carotenoids in fruits and vegetables appear to contribute to health promotion through an array of putative bioactions, including eliminating free radicals and decreasing inflammation. Lutein is a fat-soluble carotenoid present primarily in dark green leafy vegetables, and its intake and blood status are inversely associated with the risk of age-related macular degeneration, cataracts, cognitive dysfunction, and some forms of cancer. Like other carotenoids, lutein absorption is poor. Since usual dietary intakes of lutein fall short of those levels associated with many of its benefits, food engineering approaches that increase its absorption could yield important health benefits. Nanoentrapment can offer a novel approach to enhancing the absorption of poorly absorbed nutrients. Water-soluble polymeric nanoparticles have emerged as a promising material in the formulation of poorly absorbed nutrients to improve their absorption. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) has been used successfully as a biodegradable polymer and is often preferred for nanoparticle synthesis because of its well-established safety and stability in intestinal environments and its effectiveness as a carrier of lipid like compounds However, its application with carotenoids has not been reported previously. We assessed whether lutein entrapped inside PLGA nanoparticles will increase absorption in rats and in cultured colonic cells. We found that PLGA nanoparticles increased lutein absorption and accumulation in rat organs. In conclusion, delivery of lutein with polymeric nanoparticles may be an approach to improve lutein absorption.

Technical Abstract: The aim of the study was to evaluate the ability of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NP) to enhance lutein bioavailability. The bioavailability of free lutein and PLGA-NP lutein in rats was assessed by determining plasma pharmacokinetics and deposition in selected tissues. Lutein uptake and secretion was also assessed in Caco-2 cells. Compared to free lutein, PLGA-NP increased the maximal plasma concentration (Cmax) and area under the time-concentration curve in rats by 54.5- and 77.6-fold, respectively, while promoting tissue accumulation in the mesenteric fat and spleen. In comparison with micellized lutein, PLGA-NP lutein improved the Cmax in rat plasma by 15.6-fold and in selected tissues by >/=3.8-fold. In contrast, PLGA-NP lutein had a lower uptake and secretion of lutein in Caco-2 cells by 10.0- and 50.5-fold, respectively, compared to micellized lutein. In conclusion, delivery of lutein with polymeric NP may be an approach to improve the bioavailability of lutein in vivo.