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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Boston, Massachusetts » Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #331854

Research Project: Improving Cardiovascular Health with Diet

Location: Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging

Title: Fruits and vegetables get a golden halo once again: Is there more to the story?

Author
item Lichtenstein, Alice - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University

Submitted to: Circulation
Publication Type: Other
Publication Acceptance Date: 10/21/2015
Publication Date: 10/26/2015
Citation: Lichtenstein, A.H. 2015. Fruits and vegetables get a golden halo once again: Is there more to the story? Circulation. 132(21):1946-1948. doi: 10.1161/circulationaha.115.019326.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: For decades, the data have been relatively consistent; individuals who report eating more fruits and vegetables have lower rates of cardiovascular disease, stroke, cancer, diabetes, heart failure, and all-cause mortality. In this issue of Circulation, from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study, we now have new data supporting the beneficial effects of diets high in fruits and vegetables. Miedema et al based this conclusion on data collected between 1985 and 1986, and coronary artery calcium scores measured 20 years later. From these data, Miedema et al report that there was an inverse relationship between fruit and vegetable intake during young adulthood and the odds of prevalent coronary artery calcium later in life, with the association limited to women. Is the negative association between the coronary artery calcium score directly attributable to high intakes of fruits and vegetables or a constellation of factors? Perhaps we should stop focusing on individual components of the diet, particularly when we have the data for the whole diet available, and start focusing on dietary patterns.