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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Gainesville, Florida » Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology » Chemistry Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #331592

Research Project: Insect, Nematode, and Plant Semiochemical Communication Systems

Location: Chemistry Research

Title: Plant-microbe relationship that influences an insect pest of Califronia tree nuts

Author
item Beck, John
item Gee, Wai
item Higbee, Bradley - Paramount Farming Company, Inc

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/21/2016
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: California produces a large portion of the world’s supply of pistachios. The navel orangeworm moth and its larvae are considered a major pest of California pistachios. The larvae cause significant feeding damage to pistachio kernels in addition to carrying toxin-producing fungi into the nut. Despite the development of odor-based attractants for efficient monitoring of navel orangeworm in almond orchards, this success has not translated well for monitoring of navel orangeworm moths in pistachio orchards. Because navel orangeworm are known to have a mutually beneficial relationship with toxin-producing fungi as well as being attracted to odors frm fungi, our laboratory has investigated the odors emitted by pistachio kernels contaminated with naturally occurring fungi. Discussed will be results from this investigation and their application to the development of attractants for navel orangeworm in pistachio orchards.

Technical Abstract: California produces a large portion of the worldwide supply of pistachios. The navel orangeworm is considered a major insect pest of California pistachios, and causes significant damage to pistachio kernels in addition to introducing aflatoxigenic fungi. Despite the development of semiochemical-based attractants for efficient monitoring of navel orangeworm in almond orchards, this success has not translated well for monitoring of navel orangeworm in pistachio orchards. Because navel orangeworm are known to have a mutualistic relationship with aflatoxigenic fungi as well as being attracted to fungal volatiles, our laboratory has investigated the volatile profiles of pistachio kernels contaminated with naturally occurring fungi. Discussed will be results from this investigation and their application to the development of attractants for navel orangeworm in pistachio orchards.