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Research Project: New Weed Management Tools from Natural Product-Based Discoveries

Location: Natural Products Utilization Research

Title: Herbicide-mediated hormesis

Author
item BELZ, REGINA - University Of Hohenheim
item Vacant, Vacant

Submitted to: American Chemical Society Symposium Series
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: 12/12/2016
Publication Date: 7/14/2017
Citation: Belz, R.G., Duke, S.O. 2017. Herbicide-mediated hormesis. American Chemical Society Symposium Series. 1249:135-148. 10.1021/bk-2017-1249.ch001.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1021/bk-2017-1249.ch001

Interpretive Summary: Hormesis is the stimulatory effect of a subtoxic level of a toxin. This phenomenon is common with most herbicides on most plant species, although the effect is generally difficult to quantitatively repeat, even under laboratory conditions. The magnitude of and the dose required for hormesis is influenced by many biological and environmental parameters. Hormesis with glyphosate seems to be more consistent than with most other herbicides, perhaps due to its unique mode of action as a herbicide. However, little is known of the mode of action of any herbicide-mediated hormesis. Herbicide-induced hormesis may play a role in the evolution of herbicide resistance. Although subtoxic levels of herbicides are sometimes used to stimulate certain desired crop responses (e.g., sucrose accumulation in sugarcane), the unpredictability of hormesis makes it too risky for general crop production. A better understanding of plant hormetic responses to herbicides is needed.

Technical Abstract: Hormesis is the stimulatory effect of a subtoxic level of a toxin. This phenomenon is common with most herbicides on most plant species, although the effect is generally difficult to quantitatively repeat, even under laboratory conditions. The magnitude of and the dose required for hormesis is influenced by many biological and environmental parameters. Hormesis with glyphosate seems to be more consistent than with most other herbicides, perhaps due to its unique mode of action as a herbicide. However, little is known of the mode of action of any herbicide-mediated hormesis. Herbicide-induced hormesis may play a role in the evolution of herbicide resistance. Although subtoxic levels of herbicides are sometimes used to stimulate certain desired crop responses (e.g., sucrose accumulation in sugarcane), the unpredictability of hormesis makes it too risky for general crop production. A better understanding of plant hormetic responses to herbicides is needed.