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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Ithaca, New York » Robert W. Holley Center for Agriculture & Health » Plant, Soil and Nutrition Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #331120

Research Project: Genetic and Genomic Basis of Vegetable and Fruit Biology, Quality and Nutrient Content

Location: Plant, Soil and Nutrition Research

Title: Zinc and selenium accumulation and their effect on iron bioavailability in common bean seeds

Author
item Figueiredo, Marislaine - Cornell University - New York
item Boldrin, Paulo - Cornell University - New York
item Hart, Jonathan
item Andrade, Messias J.b. De - University Of Lavras(UNILAVRAS)
item Guilherme, Luiz - University Of Lavras(UNILAVRAS)
item Glahn, Raymond
item Li, Li

Submitted to: Plant Physiology and Biochemistry
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/24/2016
Publication Date: 1/23/2017
Citation: Figueiredo, M.A., Boldrin, P.F., Hart, J.J., Andrade, M., Guilherme, L., Glahn, R.P., Li, L. 2017. Zinc and selenium accumulation and their effect on iron bioavailability in common bean seeds. Plant Physiology and Biochemistry. 111:193-202.

Interpretive Summary: The common bean is the most important legume crop and targeted for micronutrient biofortification. In this study, we investigate whether it is possible to biofortify common bean with multi-micronutrients without affecting mineral bioavailability. The mineral levels were evaluated in seeds and pods during seed development. The levels of seed phytate and polyphenolics, which are known to affect Fe bioavailability, were examined in response to increased Zn and Se supplementation. The Fe bioavailability in the Zn and Se biofortified seeds was found to be not greatly affected. The result indicates that it is possible to simultaneously biofortified common bean with zinc and selenium without greatly impact on iron bioavailability for improving human nutrition.

Technical Abstract: Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) is the most important legume crop. It represents a major source of micronutrients and has been targeted for essential trace mineral enhancement (i.e. biofortification). The aim of the study was to investigate whether it is possible to biofortify seeds with multi-micronutrients without affecting mineral bioavailability in common bean. Three common bean cultivars were treated with zinc (Zn) and selenium (Se). The seed mineral concentrations during seed maturation were analyzed using an inductively coupled plasma trace analyzer emission spectrometer. Fe bioavailability in seeds was assessed using Caco-2 cell model. Common bean seeds were found to maintain relatively consistent mineral levels during seed maturation. Se and Zn treatments had minimal effects on the levels of phytic acid and polyphenols, the compounds affecting Fe bioavailability. While the inhibitory polyphenol compounds profoundly reduced Fe bioavailability, the Fe uptake was not greatly affected in seeds biofortified with Se and Zn. Our results provide information for Se and Zn enhancement in common bean and suggest it is possible to simultaneously biofortify with these essential nutrients without greatly affecting mineral bioavailability for improving human health.