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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Tifton, Georgia » Southeast Watershed Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #331110

Title: Carbon exchange and water use efficiancy for miscanthgus in the Southeast United States.

Author
item Maleski, Jerome
item Bosch, David - Dave
item Strickland, Timothy - Tim
item Williams, Randall

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/7/2016
Publication Date: 12/5/2016
Citation: Maleski, J.J., Bosch, D.D., Strickland, T.C., Williams, R.G. 2016. [ABSTRACT]Carbon exchange and water use efficiancy for miscanthgus in the Southeast United States. Presented at A Community on Ecosystem Services (ACES) Conference 12/5-9/2016, Jacksonville, Florida.

Interpretive Summary: Miscanthus is a perennial grass that is considered a promising feedstock for biofuel production. Miscanthus has the potential for greater biomass production and carbon uptake than maize or switchgrass, as well as the possibility of growing on degraded land; however, productivity depends on the relative availability of water, nutrients, and environmental suitability of the crops. In order to determine how miscanthus might perform in the Southeast, we evaluate the annual water use and productivity of miscanthus grown in a rainfed field near Tifton, Georgia, USA during the 2015 and 2016 growing seasons. We find that this strain of miscanthus has a relatively high water use relative to plant productivity suggesting that more needs to be done to develop plant varieties appropriate to the region.

Technical Abstract: Miscanthus is a perennial grass that is considered a promising feedstock for biofuel production. Miscanthus has the potential for greater biomass production and carbon uptake than maize or switchgrass, as well as the possibility of growing on degraded land; however, productivity depends on the relative availability of water, nutrients, and environmental suitability of the crops. In order to determine how miscanthus might perform in the Southeast, we evaluate the annual water use and productivity of miscanthus grown in a rainfed field near Tifton, Georgia, USA during the 2015 and 2016 growing seasons. We find that this strain of miscanthus has a relatively high water use relative to plant productivity suggesting that more needs to be done to develop plant varieties appropriate to the region.