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Research Project: New Weed Management Tools from Natural Product-Based Discoveries

Location: Natural Products Utilization Research

Title: Secondary effects of glyphosate on plants

Author
item Duke, Stephen

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/4/2016
Publication Date: 5/15/2016
Citation: Duke, S.O. 2016. Secondary effects of glyphosate on plants. In: A Era Glyhosate, Agricultura, Meio Ambiente e Homem (The Age of Glyphosate: Agriculture, Environment and Humans), D.K. Meschede and D.L.P. Gazziero, Eds., Midiograf II, Londrina, Brazil, pp. 87-96.

Interpretive Summary: Glyphosate is a unique herbicide with interesting secondary effects. Unfortunately, some have assumed that the secondary effects that occur in glyphosate-susceptible plants treated with glyphosate, such as altered mineral nutrition, reduced phenolic compound production and pathogen resistance, also occur in GR crops at recommended field rates. There is growing scientific evidence that this is generally not the case. The wide and continuing adoption of high-yielding GR crop varieties, despite rapid evolution of resistance to glyphosate by a growing number of weed species, suggests that farmers have not found significant negative secondary effects of glyphosate in GR crops.

Technical Abstract: Glyphosate is a unique herbicide with interesting secondary effects. Unfortunately, some have assumed that the secondary effects that occur in glyphosate-susceptible plants treated with glyphosate, such as altered mineral nutrition, reduced phenolic compound production and pathogen resistance, also occur in GR crops at recommended field rates. There is growing scientific evidence that this is generally not the case. The wide and continuing adoption of high-yielding GR crop varieties, despite rapid evolution of resistance to glyphosate by a growing number of weed species, suggests that farmers have not found significant negative secondary effects of glyphosate in GR crops.