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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Athens, Georgia » U.S. National Poultry Research Center » Poultry Microbiological Safety & Processing Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #330203

Research Project: Production and Processing Intervention Strategies for Poultry Associated Foodborne Pathogens

Location: Poultry Microbiological Safety & Processing Research

Title: Water sprays to lower the presence of Campylobacter on transport coop flooring in lab scale and commercial settings

Author
item Cox, Nelson - Nac
item Berrang, Mark
item NORTHCUTT, JULIE - Clemson University
item Meinersmann, Richard - Rick
item Cosby, Douglas
item OAKLEY, BRIAN - Western University Of Health Sciences
item LADLEY, SCOTT - Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS)
item HOFACRE, CHARLES - University Of Georgia
item WILSON, JEANNA - University Of Georgia

Submitted to: WATT Poultry USA
Publication Type: Trade Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/1/2016
Publication Date: 8/1/2016
Citation: Cox Jr, N.A., Berrang, M.E., Northcutt, J., Meinersmann, R.J., Cosby, D.E., Oakley, B.B., Ladley, S.R., Hofacre, C.L., Wilson, J.L. 2016. Water sprays to lower the presence of Campylobacter on transport coop flooring in lab scale and commercial settings. WATT Poultry USA. pp. 34-35.

Interpretive Summary: none

Technical Abstract: In the process of catching, transporting and holding at the processing plant, broilers can spend as much as 12 hours in transport coops. Feces expressed during this time may be more heavily contaminated with Campylobacter due to stress. In lab scale experiments, the prevalence of Campylobacter on unwashed coop flooring surfaces was reduced from 26% positive samples to 7% following a tap water spray followed by immersion in a chemical treatment. Results from a commercial slaughter plant closely resembled those from the lab scale experiments. However all of the Campylobacter contamination was not eliminated and if washing and sanitizing becomes common practice, standard protocols will need to be developed and followed to insure consistent and effective treatment of these transport coops.