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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Gainesville, Florida » Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology » Insect Behavior and Biocontrol Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #330140

Research Project: Improved Biologically-Based Methods for Insect Pest Management of Crop Insect Pests

Location: Insect Behavior and Biocontrol Research

Title: Host plant affects morphometric variation of Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae)

Author
item Paris, Thomson
item Allan, Sandra - Sandy
item Hall, David
item Hentz, Matthew
item Hetsey, Gabbriella
item Stansly, Philip

Submitted to: PeerJ
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 10/6/2016
Publication Date: 11/3/2016
Citation: Paris, T.M., Allan, S.A., Hall, D.G., Hentz, M.G., Hetsey, G.G., Stansly, P.A. 2016. Host plant affects morphometric variation of Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae). PeerJ. doi:10.7717/perj.2663.

Interpretive Summary: The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) is the insect vector of the pathogen causing citrus greening disease or Huanglongbing, which is one of the most serious citrus pests worldwide. The major targets for egg laying and development of ACP have been determined but little is known about how rearing them on different host plants influences development and activities of ACP. To determine how the plant source affects development, scientists from USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology, Gainesville, Florida, and US Horticultural Research Laboratory, Ft. Pierce, Florida, collaborated to rear ACP on six different citrus cultivars and examined the size and shape of psyllids through use of traditional and geometric morphometric techniques. Clear differences were observed in both size and shape of wings from ACP reared on different citrus cultivars. Such differences in wing size and shape may be associated with greater dispersal capability of ACP reared on specific plants and is of importance in predicting the potential risk for spreading of citrus greening into uninfected citrus.

Technical Abstract: The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), due to its potential to vector the pathogen causing citrus greening disease or huanglongbing, is one of the most serious citrus pests worldwide. While optimal plant cultivars for ACP oviposition and development have been determined, little is known of the influence of host plants on ACP reared on different host plants. ACP were reared on six different rutaceous cultivars, including Bergera koenigii, Citrus aurantifolia, Citrus macrophylla, Citrus maxima, Citrus taiwanica and Murraya exotica (=paniculata) and adults examined for morphometric variation through use of traditional and geometric morphometric analysis based on 12 traits or landmarks. Using traditional morphometric analysis, ACP reared on Citrus taiwanica were consistently smaller than those reared on other plant cultivars. Wing aspect ratio differed between C. maxima and C. taiwanica. Based on geometric morphometric analysis, significant differences in shape were detected between ACP reared on the different plant cultivars with those reared on M. exotica with narrower wings than those reared on C. macrophylla. This study provides evidence of wing size and shape differences of ACP based on host plant cultivar which potentially may impact dispersal. Further study is needed to examine the associated behavioral and physiological differences associated with the observed phenotypic differences.