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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Boston, Massachusetts » Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #330066

Research Project: Nutrition, Brain, and Aging

Location: Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging

Title: The effects of blueberry and strawberry serum metabolites on age-related oxidative and inflammatory signaling in vitro

Author
item Fisher, Derek
item Miller, Marshall
item Thangthaeng, Nopporn
item Kelly, Megan
item Bielinski, Donna - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University
item Shukitt-hale, Barbara

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/29/2016
Publication Date: 11/12/2016
Citation: Fisher, D.R., Miller, M.G., Thangthaeng, N., Kelly, M.E., Bielinski, D.F., Shukitt Hale, B. 2016. The effects of blueberry and strawberry serum metabolites on age-related oxidative and inflammatory signaling in vitro. Society for Neurscience 2016 Abstracts. Program No. 596.19.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Age-related decrements in cognition are thought to result from the increased susceptibility to and accumulating effects of oxidative stress and inflammation. Berry fruits contain a variety of bioactive polyphenolic compounds, such as anthocyanins, that exhibit potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. In previous studies, we have shown that consumption of freeze-dried whole berry powder, equivalent to 1 cup/day of blueberry (BB) or 2 cups/day of strawberry (SB), can differentially improve some aspects of cognition in healthy, older adults, compared to placebo-supplemented controls. Cell models provide valuable tools for the development of novel strategies and assessment of the mechanisms behind the protective effects of various foods against the oxidative stress and inflammation seen in aging. Because the bioactive compounds in foods are different than those found in circulation following consumption, pre-treatment of cells with serum from people fed these foods may be a more valid model system than treating with extracts of the foods themselves. In this study, we investigated whether fasting and postprandial serum from BB- or SB-supplemented older adults (60-75yo) taken at baseline or after 45 or 90 days of supplementation would reduce the production of inflammatory and oxidative stress signals, compared to a placebo group, in stressed HAPI rat microglial cells, in vitro. Serum from both blueberry and strawberry were able to reduce inflammatory stress signals, e.g. nitric oxide (p < 0.05), relative to serum from placebo controls. Measurements of oxidative stress signaling are currently ongoing. These results suggest that berry metabolites, present in the circulating blood, may be mediating the anti-inflammatory effects of dietary berry fruit. It is likely that this attenuation of inflammation is responsible for the beneficial effects on age-related declines in cognition.