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ARS Home » Midwest Area » Madison, Wisconsin » Vegetable Crops Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #329968

Research Project: Resources for the Genetic Improvement of Potato

Location: Vegetable Crops Research

Title: Demonstrating concepts of pathogenesis using effectors of Phytophthora infestans

Author
item Hayslett, Maya - University Of Wisconsin
item Kartanos, Victoria - University Of Wisconsin
item Rouse, Douglas - University Of Wisconsin
item Halterman, Dennis

Submitted to: The Plant Health Instructor
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/14/2017
Publication Date: 8/10/2017
Publication URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/5801890
Citation: Halterman, D.A., Hayslett, M.C., Kartanos, V., Rouse, D.I. 2017. Demonstrating concepts of pathogenesis using effectors of Phytophthora infestans. The Plant Health Instructor. https://doi.org/10.1094/PHI-T-2017-0610-01.

Interpretive Summary: Pathogenesis, or how pathogens cause disease, is an important concept in plant pathology. The study of pathogenesis in plant pathology has rapidly expanded and is now a significant portion of plant pathology research (especially research at the molecular level of host-pathogen interaction). With the increased focus on pathogenesis in the field and with the advancements in knowledge that have been made, we have developed a new lab exercise that more directly addresses some of these concepts, specifically the interaction of host resistance genes with pathogen effectors, and the outcome of these interactions. This is a laboratory teaching exercise that is focused on understanding the molecular interactions that take place between hosts and pathogens. It uses the potato late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans and potato resistance genes in a system developed by Dr. Halterman at the USDA. The RB protein recognizes the presence of effector IPI-O1 from Phytophthora infestans and elicits a cell death resistance response. The related IPI-O4 effector does not elicit an HR, and instead suppresses the activity of RB, even in the presence of IPI-O1. This paper is meant to distribute the information to educators that are interested in teaching molecular plant pathology at the undergraduate level.

Technical Abstract: Pathogenesis, or how pathogens cause disease, is an important concept in plant pathology. The study of pathogenesis in plant pathology has rapidly expanded and is now a significant portion of plant pathology research (especially research at the molecular level of host-pathogen interaction). With the increased focus on pathogenesis in the field and with the advancements in knowledge that have been made, we have developed a new lab exercise that more directly addresses some of these concepts, specifically the interaction of host resistance genes with pathogen effectors, and the outcome of these interactions (e.g. the hypersensitive response). This new laboratory exercise utilizes Phytophthora infestans effectors and potato resistance genes in a model system developed by Dr. Halterman at the USDA (Halterman et al. 2010). The RB protein recognizes the presence of effector IPI-O1 from Phytophthora infestans and elicits a hypersensitive cell death response. The related IPI-O4 effector does not elicit an HR, and instead suppresses the activity of RB, even in the presence of IPI-O1. This paper is meant to distribute the information to educators that are interested in teaching molecular plant pathology at the undergraduate level.