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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BHNRC) » Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center » Food Components and Health Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #329838

Research Project: Absorption, Metabolism, and Health Impacts of Bioactive Food Components

Location: Food Components and Health Laboratory

Title: Altered transport and metabolism of phenolic compounds in obesity and diabetes: implications for functional food development and assessment

Author
item Redan, Benjamin - Purdue University
item Buhman, Kimberly - Purdue University
item Novotny, Janet
item Ferruzzi, Mario - Purdue University

Submitted to: Advances in Nutrition
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/1/2016
Publication Date: 7/1/2016
Citation: Redan, B.W., Buhman, K.K., Novotny, J.A., Ferruzzi, M.G. 2016. Altered transport and metabolism of phenolic compounds in obesity and diabetes: Implications for functional food development and assessment. Advances in Nutrition. 7:1090-1104.

Interpretive Summary: Phenolic compounds are a class of plant based chemicals with numerous apparent health benefits. Dietary phenolic compounds are associated with lower risk of cardiovascular disease, improved vascular function, and enhanced glucose management. For this reason, interest in use of phenolic compounds for prevention of chronic diseases continues to grow. However, efficacy of phenolic compounds depends on the body’s ability to absorb the compounds across the gastrointestinal tract. Moreover, certain characteristics, such as obesity and diabetes, may affect absorption and metabolism of phenolic compounds. These factors must be understood in order to develop effective strategies for use of bioactive phenolics for prevention of chronic disease. The goal of this review is to discuss the inducible metabolic systems that may be influenced by disease states and how these effects impact the bioavailability and metabolism of dietary phenolic compounds. Phenolic compounds undergo complicated processes of absorption, metabolism, and excretion, and these processes can be affected by obesity, diabetes, and other disease states. These mechanisms are at least partly altered by inflammatory status, which is influenced by elevated blood glucose and accumulation of adipose tissue. While more studies are needed, the translation of benefits derived from dietary phenolic compounds to individuals with obesity or diabetes may require consideration of dosing strategies or be accompanied by adjunct therapies to improve bioavailability of the compounds. This information will be used by scientists, health practitioners, and policy makers.

Technical Abstract: Interest in application of phenolic compounds from diet or supplements for prevention of chronic diseases has grown significantly, but efficacy of such approaches in humans is largely dependent on the bioavailability and metabolism of these compounds. While food and dietary factors have been the focus of intense investigation, the impact of disease states such as obesity or diabetes on the absorption, metabolism, and eventual efficacy is critical to consider. These factors must be understood in order to develop effective strategies that leverage bioactive phenolics for prevention of chronic disease. The goal of this review is to discuss the inducible metabolic systems that may be influenced by disease states and how these effects impact the bioavailability and metabolism of dietary phenolic compounds. Since current studies generally show that obesity and/or diabetes alter absorption and excretion of these compounds, this review will include describing the absorption, conjugation, and excretion pathways for phenolics and how they are potentially altered in diseased states. A possible mechanism that will be discussed related to modulation of phenolic bioavailability and metabolism may be linked to increased inflammatory status from elevated plasma glucose levels or increased amounts of white adipose tissue. While more studies are needed, the translation of benefits derived from dietary phenolic compounds to individuals with obesity or diabetes may require consideration of dosing strategies or be accompanied by adjunct therapies to improve bioavailability of the compounds.