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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Boston, Massachusetts » Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #329831

Research Project: Nutrition, Sarcopenia, Physical Activity, and Skeletal Muscle Function in the Elderly

Location: Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging

Title: What is a clinically meaningful improvement in leg-extensor power for mobility-limited older adults?

Author
item Kim, Dylan - Massachusetts General Hospital
item Reid, Kieran - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University
item Hau, Cynthia - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University
item Phillips, Edward - Joslin Diabetes Center
item Fielding, Roger - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University

Submitted to: The Journals of Gerontology: Medical Sciences
Publication Type: Review Article
Publication Acceptance Date: 10/22/2015
Publication Date: 11/18/2015
Citation: Kim, D.R., Reid, K.F., Hau, C., Phillips, E.M., Fielding, R.A. 2015. What is a clinically meaningful improvement in leg-extensor power for mobility-limited older adults?. The Journals of Gerontology: Medical Sciences. 71(5):632-636. doi:10.1093/gerona/glv207.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: BACKGROUND: Muscle power is a key predictor of physical function in older adults; however, clinically meaningful improvements in leg-extensor muscle power have yet to be identified. The purpose of this study is to establish the minimal clinically important improvement (MCII) and substantial improvement (SI) for leg-extensor power and muscle contraction velocity in mobility-limited older adults. METHODS: Data were extracted from three randomized trials of leg-extensor muscle power training interventions (3-to-6-month duration). Measurements of leg-extensor power and velocity were obtained using dynamic bilateral leg press at 40% and 70% of the one repetition maximum. Anchor based MCIIs were calculated using selected items extracted from the Late Life Function and Disability Instrument. Standard error of measurement and effect size methods were used to calculate the distribution based MCII. RESULTS: Data from 164 participants (mean age: 76.6 +/- 5.6 years; Short Physical Performance Battery score: 7.8 +/-1.3) were used in this analysis. The respective MCII and SI estimates for 40% leg-extensor power were 18.3 (9%) and 30.5 (15%) W, and 23.1 (10%) and 41.6 (18%) W for 70% leg-extensor power. The respective MCII and SI estimates for 40% average velocity were 0.03(7%) and 0.08(18%) m/s, and 0.02(6%) and 0.05(15%) m/s for 70% average velocity. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to establish a clinically meaningful improvement of leg-extensor power (9%-10%) and velocity (6%-7%) in mobility-limited older adults. These findings should be used to aid in the design and interpretation of clinical trials and interventions that target improvements in muscle power in this high-risk population.