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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Washington, D.C. » National Arboretum » Floral and Nursery Plants Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #329336

Research Project: Genetics, Genetic Improvement, and Improved Production Efficiency of Nursery Crops

Location: Floral and Nursery Plants Research

Title: Response of container-grown flowering dogwood cultivars to sun/shade production regime, 2015

Author
item Baysal-gurel, Fulya - Tennessee State University
item Fare, Donna

Submitted to: Plant Disease Management Reports
Publication Type: Other
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/25/2016
Publication Date: 9/5/2016
Citation: Baysal-Gurel, F., Fare, D.C. 2016. Response of container-grown flowering dogwood cultivars to sun/shade production regime, 2015. Plant Disease Management Reports. 10:005.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Flowering dogwood, Cornus florida, ‘Cherokee Brave™’ and ‘Cherokee Princess’ were grown in #5 nursery containers in an amended 100% bark substrate. Treatments were assigned based on exposure time to a full sun/shade condition during the growing season: 1) plants grown in full sun, 2) plants grown in full sun until 13 Jul, then placed under 48% shade, 3) plants grown in full sun until 13 Aug, then placed under 48% shade, and 4) plants grown in 48% shade. Severity of powdery mildew was determined on 15 Jul, 2 Sep and 5 Oct and disease severity was evaluated using a scale of 0-100% foliage affected. Powdery mildew appeared naturally and disease pressure was low to moderate in this trial primarily due to fungicides periodically applied. The effects of sun/shade treatments on powdery mildew severity (final rating and AUDPC) were significant. However, the effect of cultivar or the interaction between sun/shade treatments and cultivar on powdery mildew was not significant. Regardless of cultivar, the disease was more severe with treatments 2 and 4 that were in the shade for the longest period during the growing season, compared to treatments 1 and 3 that were grown in full sun for most of the growing season.