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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Stoneville, Mississippi » Warmwater Aquaculture Research Unit » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #329290

Research Project: Evaluating Nutritional Requirements, Identifying Alternative Ingredients and Improving the Production Environment for Hybrid and Channel Catfish Production

Location: Warmwater Aquaculture Research Unit

Title: Effects of co-stocking smallmouth buffalo, Ictiobus bubalus, with channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus

Author
item Mischke, Charles - Mississippi State University
item Griffin, Matt - Mississippi State University
item Wise, David - Mississippi State University
item Greenway, Terrence - Mississippi State University

Submitted to: Journal of the World Aquaculture Society
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/12/2015
Publication Date: 4/1/2016
Citation: Mischke, C.C., Griffin, M.J., Wise, D.J., Greenway, T.E. 2016. Effects of co-stocking smallmouth buffalo, Ictiobus bubalus, with channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus. Journal of the World Aquaculture Society. 47:212-219.

Interpretive Summary: Proliferative gill disease (PGD) in catfish is caused by the myxozoan Henneguya ictaluri. The complex life cycle requires Dero digitata as the oligochaete host. Efforts to control PGD by eradicating D. digitata have been unsuccessful. Smallmouth buffalo, Ictiobus bubalus, (SMB) are opportunistic bottom feeders and a putative option for controlling D. digitata. In 2011, 15 ponds (0.4 ha) were stocked with 5000 channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus; 7 of these 15 ponds were also stocked with 300 SMB fingerlings. There were no differences in benthic invertebrate numbers or water quality variables between ponds with or without SMB. At harvest, there were no differences in percent survival, total weight, or catfish feed conversion ratio. In the second year, 18 ponds (0.4 ha) were stocked with 6000 channel catfish. Half the ponds were also stocked with 300 SMB. Sentinel fish were used to estimate disease severity, and pond waterwas collected formolecular estimation of H. ictaluri actinospore concentrations. Similar to the first year, there were no differences between treatments in any variable tested, including PGD severity in sentinel fish and parasite concentrations in pond water. Under these study conditions, presence of SMB did not have a measureable effect on PGD incidence, parasite density, or overall catfish production.

Technical Abstract: Proliferative gill disease (PGD) in catfish is caused by the myxozoan Henneguya ictaluri. The complex life cycle requires Dero digitata as the oligochaete host. Efforts to control PGD by eradicating D. digitata have been unsuccessful. Smallmouth buffalo, Ictiobus bubalus, (SMB) are opportunistic bottom feeders and a putative option for controlling D. digitata. In 2011, 15 ponds (0.4 ha) were stocked with 5000 channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus; 7 of these 15 ponds were also stocked with 300 SMB fingerlings. There were no differences in benthic invertebrate numbers or water quality variables between ponds with or without SMB. At harvest, there were no differences in percent survival, total weight, or catfish feed conversion ratio. In the second year, 18 ponds (0.4 ha) were stocked with 6000 channel catfish. Half the ponds were also stocked with 300 SMB. Sentinel fish were used to estimate disease severity, and pond waterwas collected formolecular estimation of H. ictaluri actinospore concentrations. Similar to the first year, there were no differences between treatments in any variable tested, including PGD severity in sentinel fish and parasite concentrations in pond water. Under these study conditions, presence of SMB did not have a measureable effect on PGD incidence, parasite density, or overall catfish production.