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ARS Home » Midwest Area » Ames, Iowa » National Animal Disease Center » Ruminant Diseases and Immunology Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #328186

Research Project: INTERVENTION STRATEGIES TO CONTROL VIRAL DISEASES OF CATTLE

Location: Ruminant Diseases and Immunology Research

Title: Case Report: Emergence of bovine viral diarrhea virus persistently infected calves in a closed herd

Author
item FERRO, PAMELA - Texas A&M University
item FEARNEYHOUGH, MALCOMB - Texas A&M University
item CALVERT, CLINT - Alvarado Veterinary Clinic
item Neill, John
item Ridpath, Julia

Submitted to: Bovine Practitioner Journal
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/10/2016
Publication Date: 7/26/2016
Publication URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/5490058
Citation: Ferro, P.J., Fearneyhough, M., Calvert, C., Neill, J.D., Ridpath, J.F. 2016. Case Report: Emergence of bovine viral diarrhea virus persistently infected calves in a closed herd. Bovine Practitioner Journal. 50(1):28-30.

Interpretive Summary: Infections with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) continue to have significant economic impact on the cattle industry worldwide. Biosecurity can be defined as management practices that prevent disease from entering, spreading within, or being released from operations that may contain livestock. This case report highlights a management practice that caused a biosecurity break resulting in a BVDV outbreak in a commercial cattle operation. While there was limited introduction of new animals into the herd (referred to as a closed herd), vaccination practices were in place and regular testing was conducted, the herd became infected with BVDV. One of the outcomes of this BVDV outbreak was the birth of two calves persistently infected (PI) with BVDV. While biosecurity practices were in place for resident cattle, the owners permitted visitors traveling to cattle shows to house cattle at their operation and did not isolate their own cattle for two weeks following their return from cattle shows. These practices, considered of little consequence because they were infrequent, put the operation at risk and resulted in significant economic loss to the producer. In response the producer has amended his practices to include quarantine of animals returning from cattle shows and the housing of “visiting” cattle in isolation pens with no contact with the resident herd. This case study illustrates that a biosecurity plan must consider all possible routes of introduction of pathogens into an operation.

Technical Abstract: Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) continues to have significant economic impact on the cattle industry worldwide. The virus is primarily maintained in the cattle population due to persistently infected animals. Herd surveillance along with good vaccination programs and biosecurity practices are the best way to mitigate losses and production of PI animals. Two PI calves were identified in a closed herd with excellent management practices highlighting the continued significance and persistence of this virus in the cattle population.