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ARS Home » Southeast Area » New Orleans, Louisiana » Southern Regional Research Center » Cotton Structure and Quality Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #327888

Research Project: Improved Quality Assessments of Cotton from Fiber to Final Products

Location: Cotton Structure and Quality Research

Title: The effect of seed cotton moisture during harvesting on - part 2- yarn and fabric quality

Author
item Van Der Sluijs, Marinus Hj - Commonwealth Scientific And Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO)
item Delhom, Christopher - Chris

Submitted to: Textile Research Journal
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/20/2016
Publication Date: 7/14/2016
Citation: Van Der Sluijs, M.H.J., Delhom, C.D. 2016. The effect of seed cotton moisture during harvesting on - part 2- yarn and fabric quality. Textile Research Journal. Pg 1-7. doi:10.1177/0040517516659381.

Interpretive Summary: Seed cotton was harvested at three moisture levels (<12%, >12% and >14%) using a John Deere 7760 spindle harvested. The modules were stored for 12 weeks prior to ginning and then subjected to spinning via a miniature processing system. Fine count yarns and knit fabrics were proceduced to assess the impact of the harvesting conditions on yarn and fabric quality. The study found that the card waste for the lower moisture content harvested fiber was less than the card waste for higher moisture content harvested fiber. In terms of yarn and fabric quality, the statistically significant differences observed in fiber quality did not translate into statistically significant differences in yarn or fabric quality at any moisture content level. Surprisingly the statistically significant differences in fiber color did not affect the appearance of the knitted dyed fabrics.

Technical Abstract: Part 1 of this study found that there were significant differences in terms of fiber quality and processing performance of seed cotton harvested from one field using a John Deere 7760 spindle harvester at two moisture levels, <12% and >12%, and storing the harvested modules for 12 weeks prior to ginning. In the second part of this study the fiber was spun into fine count yarns on a miniature spinning system to assess the impact on textile processing in terms of yarn and fabric quality and processing performance. Fiber samples of seed cotton harvested at <14%, from a separate study, conducted at the same time on the same field were included in this study. The study found that the card waste for the lower moisture content harvested fiber was less than the card waste for higher moisture content harvested fiber.. In terms of yarn and fabric quality, the statistically significant differences observed in fiber quality did not translate into statistically significant differences in yarn or fabric quality at any moisture content level. Surprisingly the statistically significant differences in fiber color did not affect the appearance of the knitted dyed fabrics.