Skip to main content
ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Pullman, Washington » Grain Legume Genetics Physiology Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #327877

Research Project: Genetic Improvement of Cool Season Food Legumes

Location: Grain Legume Genetics Physiology Research

Title: Identification of quantitative trait loci controlling root and shoot traits associated to drought tolerance in a lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) recombinant inbred line population

Author
item Idrissi, Omar - Ghent University
item Udupa, Sripada - Institute For Agricultural And Fisheries Research (ILVO)
item De Keyser, Ellen - Institute For Agricultural And Fisheries Research (ILVO)
item Mcgee, Rebecca
item Coyne, Clarice - Clare
item Saha, Gopesh - Washington State University
item Muehlbauer, Fred - Washington State University
item Van Damme, Patrick - Institute For Agricultural And Fisheries Research (ILVO)
item De Riek, Jan - Institute For Agricultural And Fisheries Research (ILVO)

Submitted to: Frontiers in Plant Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/8/2016
Publication Date: 8/23/2016
Citation: Idrissi, O., Udupa, S.M., De Keyser, E., Mcgee, R.J., Coyne, C.J., Saha, G., Muehlbauer, F., Van Damme, P., De Riek, J. 2016. Identification of quantitative trait loci controlling root and shoot traits associated to drought tolerance in a lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) recombinant inbred line population. Frontiers in Plant Science. doi: 10.3389/fpls.2016.01174.

Interpretive Summary: Drought is one of the major abiotic stresses limiting lentil productivity in rainfed production systems. Previous studies have determined that specific rooting patterns can be associated with drought avoidance mechanisms however, rating rooting patterns is difficult and labor and cost intensive and limits its usefullness in a breeding program. The objective of this study was to identify chromosomal regions associated with drought tolerance and rooting patterns in lentil. We used modern genotyping methods combined with statistical methodology to identify 19 chromosomal regions in lentil associated with desirable rooting patterns. This study provides valuable genetic markers closely linked to drought tolerance root characteristics that can be used in lentil breeding programs.

Technical Abstract: Drought is one of the major abiotic stresses limiting lentil productivity in rainfed production systems. Specific rooting patterns can be associated with drought avoidance mechanisms that can be used in lentil breeding. In all, 252 co-dominant and dominant markers were used for genetic linkage map construction using a lentil recombinant inbred line population derived from a cross of ILL6002 x ILL5888. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis based on greenhouse experiments for root and shoot traits during two seasons under well-watered and progressive drought-stressed conditions was performed using the linkage map. A genetic map of nine linkage groups (LG) spanning 2022.8 cM was developed. Nineteen QTLs controlling a total of 14 root and shoot traits were identified. A QTL-hotspot genomic region related to a number of root and shoot characteristics associated with drought tolerance such as dry root biomass, root surface area, lateral root number, dry shoot biomass and shoot length was identified on LG VII. A QTL related to root-shoot ratio, an important trait for drought avoidance was detected that explained the highest phenotypic variance of 27.6 % and 28.9 % under the drought-stressed treatment for the two consecutive seasons, respectively. This QTL was close to the SNP marker TP6337 located on LG IX and also was flanked by the two SNP TP518 and TP1280. An important QTL related to lateral root number was identified on LG III position close to TP3371 and flanked by TP5093 and TP6072 SNP markers. Also, a QTL associated with specific root length was identified on LG IV close to TP1873 and flanked by F7XEM6b SRAP marker and TP1035 SNP marker. Our results could be used for MAS in lentil breeding programs targeting root and shoot characteristics conferring drought avoidance as an efficient alternative to conventional breeding methods.