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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Stuttgart, Arkansas » Dale Bumpers National Rice Research Center » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #327511

Research Project: Genomic Approaches and Genetic Resources for Improving Rice Yield and Grain Quality

Location: Dale Bumpers National Rice Research Center

Title: Response Variability across Diverse Rice Accessions under Rising Temperature and Increasing Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide

Author
item Wang, Diane - Cornell University - New York
item Bunce, James
item Tomecek, Martha
item Gealy, David
item Mcclung, Anna
item Mcclung, Anna
item Mccouch, Susan - Cornell University - New York
item Ziska, Lewis

Submitted to: Rice Technical Working Group Meeting Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: 12/23/2015
Publication Date: 7/2/2017
Citation: Wang, D.R., Bunce, J.A., Tomecek, M.B., Gealy, D.R., McClung, A.M., Mccouch, S.R., Ziska, L.H. 2017. Response Variability across Diverse Rice Accessions under Rising Temperature and Increasing Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide. Proc. 36th Rice Technical Working Group Meeting, Galveston, TX, p. 84. March 1-4, 2016. CDROM.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Evaluating variability of rice response to concurrent increases in CO2 and temperature forecasted for future climates is a prerequisite step towards characterizing the genetic architecture underlying this response. Expanding on previous single cultivar studies, we evaluated eleven biogeographically diverse rice accessions (Nipponbare, Geumbyeo, Jefferson, IL 43-1-2, Shirkati, WAB 56-104, DJ123, Teqing, IR64, AR-1995-StgS, IRGC105491) for yield and growth related traits under two CO2 conditions (400 and 600 µmol mol-1) and four temperature regimes (29°C day/21°C night; 29°C day/21°C night with additional heat stress at anthesis; 34°C day/26°C night; and 34°C day/26°C night with additional heat stress at anthesis). We aimed to address the following questions: 1) What are the overall effects of CO2, temperature, and their interaction on distinct rice lines, and do they support past findings on single cultivars? 2) Is there response differentiation within rice, and how does that relate to known genetic differentiation? 3) Are some accessions more resilient than others? Overall, we find that high carbon dioxide and high temperature act antagonistically and report differential response to CO2 x temperature interaction between INDICA/INDICA-like and JAPONICA rice accessions.