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ARS Home » Midwest Area » Ames, Iowa » National Animal Disease Center » Infectious Bacterial Diseases Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #327493

Research Project: IMMUNOLOGY AND INTERVENTION STRATEGIES FOR JOHNE'S DISEASE

Location: Infectious Bacterial Diseases Research

Title: Effects of mineral and vitamin supplementation to pasteurized whole milk diets on growth and health of preruminant Holstein bull calves

Author
item Wood, D - Animix
item Kruger, L - Iowa State University
item Dehghan, M - University Of Tehran
item Stabel, Judith
item Engstrom, M - Dsm
item Beitz, D - Iowa State University
item Blome, R - Animix

Submitted to: American Dairy Science Association (ADSA) - American Society of Animal Science (ASAS) Joint Annual Meeting
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/11/2016
Publication Date: 7/19/2016
Citation: Wood, D., Kruger, L.A., Dehghan, M., Stabel, J.R., Engstrom, M.A., Beitz, D.C., Blome, R. 2016. Effects of mineral and vitamin supplementation to pasteurized whole milk diets on growth and health of preruminant Holstein bull calves. American Dairy Science Association (ADSA) - American Society of Animal Science (ASAS) Joint Annual Meeting. Wood, D., Krueger, L.A., Dehghan, M., Stabel, J.R., Engstrom, M.A., Beitz, D.C., Blome, R., 2016. Joint Annual Meeting of Animal and Dairy Science.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Our objective was to determine whether supplementation of vitamins and trace minerals (VTM), formulated to meet or exceed NRC requirements when added to pasteurized whole milk (PWM), increases challenge resolution and prevents intestinal macromolecular permeability after injection with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Neonatal Holstein bull calves (n= 24) were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 dietary treatments. Calves were individually fed PWM diets for 15 d at a low (LM; 3.8 L) or high level (HM; 7.6 L) of daily intake and were supplemented (+) or not supplemented (-) with a commercial VTM premix (Animix, Inc.). No starter grain was offered. At d 13 of age, calves were injected subcutaneously with LPS of E. coli (3 ug/kg of BW) and orally administered D-mannitol and lactulose to measure intestinal paracellular transport of macromolecules. VTM supplementation increased vitamin E in serum at d 7 compared with VTM(-) calves (2.22 ± 0.26 and 1.37 ± 0.17 ug/mL; P < 0.05), but vitamin E was not different among groups at the time of challenge. VTM(+) calves also demonstrated increased plasma Fe at 48 h post-challenge compared with VTM(-) calves (1.11 ± 0.18 and 0.58 ± 0.08 ug/mL; P < 0.05). Cu (0.87 ± 0.06 and 0.72 ± 0.05 ug/mL; P < 0.05), Mg (19.1 ± 0.37 and 17.98 ± 0.41 ug/mL; P < 0.05), and P (82.7 ± 2.6 and 75.8 ± 2.4 ug/mL; P < 0.1) were greater in HM than LM calves, respectively, throughout the study. Inflammatory acute phase protein haptoglobin was greatest in HM(-) calves (P < 0.05) on both d 13 and 15 (1040.7 ± 305.4 and 782.6 ± 204.1), whereas differences in serum amyloid A and intestinal permeability were not detected. ADG from d 1 to 13 was greater in HM than LM calves (0.57 ± 0.03 and 0.45 ± 0.04 kg/d; P < 0.05) with no VTM effect. From d 13 to 15 (during LPS challenge), total gain was greater in HM(+) than HM(-) calves (0.48 ± 0.04 and 0.39 ± 0.04 kg, P < 0.1). We conclude that VTM supplementation to PWM improved performance during challenge and affected Fe and vitamin E, whereas increased milk intake increased Cu, Mg, and P in plasma. Increased haptoglobin in HM(-) calves indicates decreased challenge resolution when fed PWM not supplemented with VTM according to NRC guidelines.