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Research Project: Genetic Characterization, Taxonomy, and Acquisition of Genetic Resources for Carrot, Potato, and Their Related Wild Species

Location: Vegetable Crops Research

Title: Taxonomy of wild potatoes in northern South America (Solanum section Petota)

Author
item SPOONER, DAVID
item JANSKY, SHELLEY
item RODRIGUEZ, FLOR - INTERNATIONAL POTATO CENTER
item REINHARD, SIMON - INTERNATIONAL POTATO CENTER
item AMES, MERCEDES - BIOMAX INFORMATICS AG
item FAJARDO, DIEGO - NATIONAL CENTER FOR GENOME RESEARCH
item CASTILLO, RAUL - CENTER FOR SUGARCANE INVESTIGATION

Submitted to: Systematic Botany Monographs
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/16/2018
Publication Date: 6/30/2019
Citation: Spooner, D.M., Jansky, S.H., Rodriguez, F., Reinhard, S., Ames, M., Fajardo, D., Castillo, R. 2019. Taxonomy of wild potatoes in northern South America (Solanum section Petota). Systematic Botany Monographs. 1-209. https://www.jstor.org/stable/25027915.

Interpretive Summary: Wild and cultivated potatoes have been the subject of intensive taxonomic work since the description of the cultivated potato in 1753. In total, there are 494 taxonomic names for wild potatoes. Different taxonomists applied various taxonomic philosophies and species concepts to wild and cultivated potatoes. Hypotheses of the number of species and their interrelationships have differed greatly among authors. The last taxonomic treatment of wild and cultivated potatoes by Jack Hawkes in 1990 recognized 228 wild species and seven cultivated species, divided into 21 taxonomic groups, technically called series. The present taxonomic treatment recognizes 60 wild potato species and partitions them into five species groups, recognizing only about half of the species from northern South America relative to the most recent taxonomic treatments by J. G. Hawkes. We summarize recent morphological and molecular studies of species limits and their interrelationships; provide descriptions, synonymies (including designations of lectotypes), illustrations of all species, localities, disease resistances, and distribution maps.

Technical Abstract: Solanum section Petota, which includes the cultivated potato (S. tuberosum) and its wild relatives, is distributed from the southwestern United States to central Argentina, Uruguay, and adjacent Chile. This taxonomic treatment includes all wild species of section Petota from northern South America that includes Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. It is the last of five taxonomic treatments of a monophyletic potato, tomato, section Etuberosum clade, including treatments of 1) wild potatoes from North and Central America, 2) wild potatoes from southern South America, including close outgroup section Etuberosum), 3) cultivated potatoes, and 4) wild tomatoes. Wild species of section Petota includes diploids (2n = 24), triploids (2n = 36), tetraploids (2n = 48), and hexaploids (2n = 72); with all of these levels represented in northern South America. We here recognize 60 species from section Petota in this region, and partition them into five species groups, recognizing only about half of the species from northern South America relative to the most recent taxonomic treatments by J. G. Hawkes and C. M. Ochoa. We summarize recent morphological and molecular studies of species limits and their interrelationships; provide descriptions, synonymies (including designations of lectotypes), illustrations of all species, localities, disease resistances, and distribution maps.