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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Byron, Georgia » Fruit and Tree Nut Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #326267

Research Project: New Tools for Managing Key Pests of Pecan and Peach

Location: Fruit and Tree Nut Research

Title: Basic and applied research: Entomopathogenic nematodes

Author
item Shapiro Ilan, David
item Hazir, Selcuk - Adnan Mederes University
item Glazer, Itamar - Volcani Center (ARO)

Submitted to: Academic Press
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/26/2016
Publication Date: 1/3/2017
Citation: Shapiro Ilan, D.I., Hazir, S., Glazer, I. 2017. Basic and applied research: Entomopathogenic nematodes. IN: Lacey, L. A. (Ed.), Microbial Agents for Control of Insect Pests: from discovery to commercial development and use. Academic Press, Amsterdam, pp. 91-105.

Interpretive Summary: Entomopathogenic nematodes (also called beneficial nematodes) kill insects with the aid of their bacterial symbionts. These nematodes are potent environmentally friendly natural control agents that have been widely commercialized for control of economically important insect pests. Success relies on various factors such as the kind of nematode being used, interactions with other organisms in the soil as well as soil moisture, UV radiation etc. Production, formulation and application technology and environmental manipulation also influence successful pest control. Advances in these areas are poised to expand the utility of entomopathogenic nematodes in various cropping systems. The objective of this chapter is to review the basic biology of entomopathogenic nematodes in the context of microbial control.

Technical Abstract: Entomopathogenic nematodes in the genera Heterorhabditis and Steinernema kill arthropods with the aid of their bacterial symbionts. These nematodes are potent microbial control agents that have been widely commercialized for control of economically important insect pests. Biocontrol efficacy relies on both abiotic and biotic influences, and can be enhanced through improving the nematode strain and stability of beneficial traits; production, formulation and application technology; or through environmental manipulation. Advances in these areas are poised to expand the utility of entomopathogenic nematodes in various cropping systems. The objective of this chapter is to review the basic biology of entomopathogenic nematodes in the context of microbial control.