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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Davis, California » Western Human Nutrition Research Center » Obesity and Metabolism Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #326245

Research Project: Improving Public Health by Understanding Diversity in Diet, Body, and Brain Interactions

Location: Obesity and Metabolism Research

Title: Umbilical Cord Blood Metabolomics Reveal Distinct Signatures of Dyslipidemia Prior to Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia and Pulmonary Hypertension

Author
item LA FRANO, MICHAEL - University Of California
item FAHMANN, JOHANNES - University Of California
item GRAPOV, DMITRY - University Of California
item PEDERSEN, THERESA - University Of California
item Newman, John
item FIEHN, OLIVER - University Of California
item MESTAN, KAREN - Northwest University
item STEINHORN, ROBIN - University Of California
item WEDGWOOD, STEPHEN - University Of California

Submitted to: Circulation
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/15/2018
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Background: Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a common consequence of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and remains a primary contributor to sickness and death in preterm infants. Since no reliable diagnostic markers for PH exist, understanding the underlying perturbations that lead to the development of PH in the presence of BPD is of utmost importance. To look for a novel diagnostic PH marker, state-of-the-art analytics were used to perform a broad screen of metabolites in umbilical cord blood (UCB) plasma from preterm infants who did or did not subsequently develop PH. A total of 1656 unique chemical entities were detected of which 407 were identified. PH-associated metabolic perturbations were characterized by changes that suggest a reduced phospholipid biosynthesis capacity, an increase in vasodilatory lipid mediator destruction, and an increase in free fatty acids and certain triglyceride species, indicating subtle perterbations in lipid metabolism. Conversely, BPD presence and severity were positively associated with UCB choline, palmitoleic acid, and pro-inflammatory lipid mediators including prostaglandin E2 and a variety of linoleic acid oxidation products. Hazard ratio models identified total UCB free fatty acids and phosphatidylcholines as weak, yet promising independent risk markers for development of PH. In conclusion, this expansive evaluation of cord blood plasma identified compounds reflecting metabolism alterations that differentiate subjects both by BPD severity and PH development. Total UCB free fatty acids and phosphatidylcholines may serve as potential independent risk markers for PH development, but further studies are needed and warranted.

Technical Abstract: Background: Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a common consequence of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and remains a primary contributor to increased mortality and morbidity among preterm infants. There are no reliable markers for diagnosing PH. Understanding the underlying perturbations that lead to the development of PH in the presence of BPD is of utmost importance. Methods and Results: A multi-platform metabolomics approach using both untargeted and targeted methods was used to characterize metabolic perturbations in umbilical cord blood (UCB) plasma from preterm infants who did or did not develop subsequent PH. A total of 1656 features were detected of which 407 were annotated by metabolite structures. PH-associated metabolic perturbations were characterized by: 1) elevations in oxylipins derived from soluble epoxide hydrolase and non-enzymatic oxidation; 2) reductions in major choline-containing phosphopolipids suggesting alterations in pulmonary surfactant bioavailability; 3) elevations in free fatty acids and select triacylglycerides indicating altered lipid metabolism. UCB choline, palmitoleic acid, PGE1, PGE2, 9- and 13-HOTE, 9- and 13-HODE, and 9- and 13-KODE were found to be positively associated with BPD presence and severity. Cox proportional hazard ratio models identified total UCB free fatty acids (HR: 1.42 [C.I. 0.96–1.88]; p: 0.14 and 1.6 [C.I. 1.08-2.13]; p: 0.078 for univariate and multivariate analyses, respectively) and phosphatidylcholines (Hazard Ratio: 0.76 [C.I. 0.24-1.27]; p: 0.29) and 0.44 [C.I. -0.64-1.51]; p: 0.131 for univariate and multivariate analyses, respectively) as promising independent risk markers for development of PH. Conclusions: This expansive evaluation of cord blood plasma identifies compounds reflecting altered metabolism that differentiate subjects both by BPD severity and PH development. Total UCB free fatty acids and phosphatidylcholines may serve as potential independent risk markers for PH development. Further studies are warranted.