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Research Project: Childhood Obesity Prevention

Location: Children's Nutrition Research Center

Title: Assessing dietary intake in childhood cancer survivors: Food frequency questionnaire versus 24-hour diet recalls

Author
item Zhang, Fang - Friedman School At Tufts
item Roberts, Susan - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University
item Must, Aviva - Tufts University
item Wong, William - Children'S Nutrition Research Center (CNRC)
item Gilhooly, Cheryl - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University
item Kelly, Michael - Tufts - New England Medical Center
item Parsons, Susan - Tufts - New England Medical Center
item Saltzman, Edward - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University

Submitted to: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/9/2015
Publication Date: 10/1/2015
Citation: Zhang, F.F., Roberts, S.B., Must, A., Wong, W.W., Gilhooly, C.H., Kelly, M.J., Parsons, S.K., Saltzman, E. 2015. Assessing dietary intake in childhood cancer survivors: Food frequency questionnaire versus 24-hour diet recalls. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition. 61(4):499-502.

Interpretive Summary: Cancer treatment in children may affect their food intakes. The accuracy of self-reported food intakes among children recovered from cancer treatment is not known. It is important to know exactly how much foods these children are eating because a lack of enough food intake may slow their recovery. We compared the self-reported food intakes using food frequency questionnaires among children who recovered from cancer treatment with food intakes measured by repeated 24-hour food recalls and by the doubly labeled water method. The doubly labeled water method is considered the reference method to measure food intake under free-living conditions. The self-reported food intakes were 22% lower than the food intakes measured by the reference method. The repeated 24-hour food recalls were similar to those measured by the reference method but the method is intrusive and labor intensive. Therefore, the self-reported food intake method should not be used to assess the nutrition needs of children who recovered from cancer treatment.

Technical Abstract: Cancer diagnosis and treatment may influence dietary intake. The validity of using self-reported methods to quantify dietary intake has not been evaluated in childhood cancer survivors. We validated total energy intake (EI) reported from Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) and repeated 24-hour diet recalls against total energy expenditure (TEE) measured using the doubly labeled water method in 16 childhood cancer survivors. Dietary underreporting, assessed by (EI-TEE)/TEE'X'100%, was 22% for FFQ and 1% for repeated 24hours. FFQ significantly underestimates dietary intake and should not be used to assess the absolute intake of foods and nutrients in childhood cancer survivors.