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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Wyndmoor, Pennsylvania » Eastern Regional Research Center » Food Safety and Intervention Technologies Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #325340

Research Project: INTERVENTION TECHNOLOGIES FOR MINIMALLY PROCESSED FOODS

Location: Food Safety and Intervention Technologies Research

Title: Cost modeling of biocontrol strains Pseudomonas chlororaphis and P. flurorescens for competitive exclusion of Salmonella enterica on tomatoes

Author
item Olanya, Modesto
item Sites, Joseph
item Hoshide, Aaron

Submitted to: Journal of Food Protection
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/16/2016
Publication Date: 7/31/2016
Citation: Olanya, O.M., Sites, J.E., Hoshide, A.K. 2016. Cost modeling of biocontrol strains Pseudomonas chlororaphis and P. flurorescens for competitive exclusion of Salmonella enterica on tomatoes. Journal of Food Protection. 79:182-183.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Biological control of foodborne pathogens may complement postharvest intervention measures to enhance food safety of minimally processed produce. The purpose of this research was to develop cost model estimates for application of competitive exclusion process (CEM) using Pseudomonas chlororaphis and P. fluorescens (non-plant pathogenic and non-human pathogen) as biocontrol microbes against S. enterica on tomatoes. Cost estimates were based on material inputs, equipment, facilities, and projected processing conditions similar to that of postharvest packaging of tomatoes. Microbiological data for inactivation of S. enterica was based on published data. Biocontrol microbes were grown on growth media in a self contained unit. The small scale processing facility was assumed to have a processing capacity of 2,000 kg of tomatoes /hour for 16 h per day, and operational 6 days a week and for 3-months /year. Large scale facility was assumed to process 100,000 kg of tomatoes/hour for the operational period. Estimated capital investment costs for small-scale and large-scale models (production facility) were US$ 391,000 and US$ 2.1 million. Total annual costs (operational plus ownership) of US$ 162,000 and US$ 2 million were estimated for small and large-scale models, respectively. The total annual cost for application of a CEM for biocontrol of S. enterica on tomato was estimated at US$ 0.0058 to 0.073 /kg of tomato. In comparison, chlorine wash (sodium hypochlorite) and gaseous ClO2 technologies were estimated at US$ 0.00046/kg and US$ 0.02-0.21/kg, respectively. CEM may complement existing technologies if efficacy and delivery systems can be optimized and their effects on gut microflora are assessed. CEM may increase food safety and extend produce shelf-life.