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ARS Home » Plains Area » El Reno, Oklahoma » Grazinglands Research Laboratory » Agroclimate and Natural Resources Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #325195

Research Project: ADAPTING SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION TO MEET THE CHALLENGES OF A CHANGING CLIMATE

Location: Agroclimate and Natural Resources Research

Title: Adaptation to climate variability: The role of the USDA Southern Plains Climate Hub

Author
item Steiner, Jean

Submitted to: Miscellaneous Publishing Information Bulletin
Publication Type: Research Technical Update
Publication Acceptance Date: 12/3/2015
Publication Date: 12/3/2015
Citation: Steiner, J.L. 2015. Adaptation to climate variability: The role of the USDA Southern Plains Climate Hub. Miscellaneous Publishing Information Bulletin. Available:http://www.okepscor.org/public-outreach/news/ok-nsf-epscor-annual-state-conference-putting-our-mark-climate-research.

Interpretive Summary: The Southern Plains USDA Climate Hub was established in 2014 in El Reno, Oklahoma to develop and deliver science-based, information and technologies to agricultural and natural resource land managers that enable climate-informed decision-making, and to provide access to assistance to implement those decisions. The goal of this the USDA-led partnership is to fosters robust, resilient, and healthy natural- and agro-ecosystems under increasing weather variability and a changing climate in the Southern Plains states of Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas. The conceptual framework of the Climate Hub network is nationally coordinated and regionally led efforts to synthesize and deliver climate information and tools; and to provide communication and linkage across science and technology providers, technology transfer providers, and land management stakeholders, including farmers, ranchers, forest managers, tribes, and others. The core values of the Climate Hub network is to be science-driven, stakeholder-centered, cooperative, and efficient. The Work Plan Elements are focused around Partnerships and Coordination, Research Outreach, Information Synthesis, Assessments, Education, Communication and Delivery Strategy, and Adaptation and Mitigation Demonstrations. Over the first two years, the USDA Southern Plains Climate Hub has strived to be a trusted and easy-to-use source for guidance on adapting agricultural practice to ongoing climate change, primarily for producers, landowners, foresters, and their advisors. Resources provided are an evolving collection of information and links to resources produced by everyone working on aspects of this problem for this region. This can only be achieved through a robust, regional partnership across USDA-University-Private Sector research, Extension, and technical support entities.

Technical Abstract: The Southern Plains USDA Climate Hub was established in 2014 in El Reno, Oklahoma to develop and deliver science-based, information and technologies to agricultural and natural resource land managers that enable climate-informed decision-making, and to provide access to assistance to implement those decisions. The goal of this the USDA-led partnership is to fosters robust, resilient, and healthy natural- and agro-ecosystems under increasing weather variability and a changing climate in the Southern Plains states of Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas. The conceptual framework of the Climate Hub network is nationally coordinated and regionally led efforts to synthesize and deliver climate information and tools; and to provide communication and linkage across science and technology providers, technology transfer providers, and land management stakeholders, including farmers, ranchers, forest managers, tribes, and others. The core values of the Climate Hub network is to be science-driven, stakeholder-centered, cooperative, and efficient. The Work Plan Elements are focused around Partnerships and Coordination, Research Outreach, Information Synthesis, Assessments, Education, Communication and Delivery Strategy, and Adaptation and Mitigation Demonstrations. Over the first two years, the USDA Southern Plains Climate Hub has strived to be a trusted and easy-to-use source for guidance on adapting agricultural practice to ongoing climate change, primarily for producers, landowners, foresters, and their advisors. Resources provided are an evolving collection of information and links to resources produced by everyone working on aspects of this problem for this region. This can only be achieved through a robust, regional partnership across USDA-University-Private Sector research, Extension, and technical support entities.