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ARS Home » Plains Area » Manhattan, Kansas » Center for Grain and Animal Health Research » ABADRU » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #325002

Research Project: BLUETONGUE VIRUS PATHOGENESIS, EPIDEMIOLOGY, AND CONTROL MEASURES

Location: Arthropod-borne Animal Diseases Research

Title: Molecular evolution of epizootic hemorrhagic disease viruses in North America based on historical isolates

Author
item Wilson, William
item Ruder, Mark
item Jasperson, Dane
item Smith, Timothy - Tim
item Naraghi Arani, Pejman
item Lenhoff, Raymond - Cerus
item Stallknecht, D - University Of Georgia
item Valdivia-granda, W - Orion Integrated Biosciences
item Sheron, D - Orion Integrated Biosciences

Submitted to: Virus Genes
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/31/2016
Publication Date: 4/23/2016
Citation: Wilson, W.C., Ruder, M.G., Jasperson, D.C., Smith, T.P., Naraghi Arani, P., Lenhoff, R., Stallknecht, D.E., Valdivia-Granda, W.A., Sheron, D. 2016. Molecular evolution of epizootic hemorrhagic disease viruses in North America based on historical isolates. Virus Genes. 52:495-508.

Interpretive Summary: Epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) is an insect-transmitted viral disease that has significant impact on wild and captive white-tailed deer. Usually subclinical in cattle, severe clinical disease was reported among cattle in the United States in 2012. To understand the potential role of viral genetics in the epidemiology of hemorrhagic disease, a molecular characterization of North American EHDV strains from 1955-2012 was conducted. Overall, this study indicates that the genetic make up of EHDV populations in North America have slowly evolved over time. The data also suggested limited reassortment events between serotypes 1 and 2 and introduces a new analysis tool for more detailed sequence pattern analysis.

Technical Abstract: Epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) is an orbivirus of the Reoviridae family that has significant impact on wild and captive white-tailed deer. Although closely related to bluetongue virus (BTV) that can cause disease in sheep and cattle, North American EHDV historically has not been associated with disease in cattle or sheep. Severe disease in cattle has been reported with other EHDV strains from East Asia and the Middle East. Recently, clinical disease was reported among cattle in the United States during a 2012 EHD outbreak. To understand the potential role of viral genetics in the epidemiology of hemorrhagic disease, a molecular characterization of North American EHDV strains from 1955-2012 was conducted conventional phylogenetic analysis and a new classification approach using motif fingerprint patterns. Overall, this study indicates that the genetic make up of EHDV populations in North America have slowly evolved over time. The data also suggested limited reassortment events between serotypes 1 and 2 and introduces a new analysis tool for more detailed sequence pattern analysis.