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Research Project: Genetic Improvement of Small Grains for Biotic and Abiotic Stress Tolerance and Characterization of Pathogen Populations

Location: Plant Science Research

Title: 2014-15 North Carolina Wheat Survey Results

Author
item Cowger, Christina

Submitted to: Popular Publication
Publication Type: Popular Publication
Publication Acceptance Date: 10/20/2015
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: An informal survey of North Carolina wheat growers was conducted in 2014- 15. The survey asked how many acres of which wheat varieties they planted in 2014. The information was gathered to estimate the percentage of wheat acres in North Carolina that are moderately resistant (MR) to Fusarium head blight (scab). The survey gathered reports of about 82,500 wheat acres planted in 2014. These acres were reported by nearly 200 respondents in at least 13 North Carolina counties, widely scattered among the principal wheat-growing regions of North Carolina. This informal survey put the percentage of MR wheat acres in North Carolina at 22% for 2014-15. At the same time, a different survey of randomly chosen North Carolina wheat growers conducted by the National Agricultural Statistics Service in 2014 produced an estimate that 15% of soft red winter wheat acres in North Carolina were MR to scab (out of a total of 18,892 acres reported). Thus, the two estimates were similar, and both were low. When scab is severe, fungicides alone are inadequate. Scab can occur in any part of North Carolina in any year, and can result in major economic losses. Scab-resistant varieties are a key component of wheat profitability.

Technical Abstract: An informal survey of North Carolina wheat growers was conducted in 2014- 15. The survey asked how many acres of which wheat varieties they planted in 2014. A major reason for gathering this information was to estimate the percentage of wheat acres in North Carolina that are moderately resistant (MR) to Fusarium head blight (scab). The survey gathered reports of about 82,500 wheat acres planted in 2014. These acres were reported by nearly 200 respondents in at least 13 North Carolina counties, widely scattered among the principal wheat-growing regions of North Carolina. Surveys were filled out at winter meetings, field days, the NCSGGA board meeting, and on other occasions. This informal survey put the percentage of MR wheat acres in North Carolina at 22% for 2014-15. At the same time, a different survey of randomly chosen North Carolina wheat growers conducted by the National Agricultural Statistics Service in 2014 produced an estimate that 15% of soft red winter wheat acres in North Carolina were MR to scab (out of a total of 18,892 acres reported). Thus, the two estimates were similar, and both were low. When scab is severe, fungicides alone are inadequate. Scab can occur in any part of North Carolina in any year, and can result in major economic losses. Scab-resistant varieties are a key component of wheat profitability.