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Research Project: MANAGING WATER AVAILABILITY AND QUALITY TO MAINTAIN OR INCREASE AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION, CONSERVE NATURAL RESOURCES, AND ENHANCE ENVIRONMENT

Location: Coastal Plain Soil, Water and Plant Conservation Research

Title: Emerging technologies for sustainable irrigation – a tribute to the career of Terry Howell, Sr. Selected papers from the 2015 ASABE and IA irrigation symposium

Author
item Lamm, F. - Arkansas State University
item Stone, Kenneth - Ken
item Dukes, M. - University Of Florida
item Howell, Terry
item Robbins, Jr., J. - Collaborator
item Mecham, B. - Collaborator

Submitted to: Transactions of the ASABE
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/23/2016
Publication Date: 2/26/2016
Citation: Lamm, F.R., Stone, K.C., Dukes, M.D., Howell, T.A., Robbins, Jr., J.W., Mecham, B.Q. 2016. Emerging technologies for sustainable irrigation – a tribute to the career of Terry Howell, Sr. Selected papers from the 2015 ASABE and IA irrigation symposium. Transactions of the ASABE. 59(1): 155-161. doi: 10.13031/trans.59.11706.

Interpretive Summary: In November 2015, a symposium was held on “Emerging Technologies in Sustainable Irrigation – A Tribute to the Career of Terry Howell, Sr.” at the Joint ASABE/Irrigation Association (IA) Irrigation Symposium in Long Beach, California. The joint cooperation on irrigation symposiums between ASABE and IA can be traced back to 1970 and this interim time period roughly coincides with the career of Dr. Howell. The cooperative symposia have offered an important venue for discussion of emerging technologies that can lead to sustainable irrigation. This most recent symposium is just another point on the continuum. This manuscript provides both an introduction and summary of fifteen articles selected from 62 papers and presentation at the symposium. The articles in this Special Collection address three major topic areas: evapotranspiration measurement and determination; irrigation systems and their associated technologies; and irrigation scheduling and water management. While these 15 articles are not inclusive of all the important advances in irrigation since 1970, they do illustrate that continued progress occurs through a combination of recognition of the current status and the postulation of new ideas to advance our understanding of irrigation engineering and science. The global food and water challenges will require continued progress from our portion of the scientific community.

Technical Abstract: This article is an introduction to the “Emerging Technologies in Sustainable Irrigation – A Tribute to the Career of Terry Howell, Sr.” Special Collection in this issue of Transactions ASABE and the next issue of Applied Engineering in Agriculture, consisting of 15 articles selected from 62 papers and presentations at the ASABE/Irrigation Association (IA) joint irrigation symposium, which was held in November 2015 in Long Beach, California. The joint cooperation on irrigation symposiums between ASABE and IA can be traced back to 1970 and this interim time period roughly coincides with the career of Dr. Howell. The cooperative symposia have offered an important venue for discussion of emerging technologies that can lead to sustainable irrigation. This most recent symposium is just another point on the continuum. The articles in this Special Collection address three major topic areas: evapotranspiration measurement and determination; irrigation systems and their associated technologies; and irrigation scheduling and water management. While these 15 articles are not inclusive of all the important advances in irrigation since 1970, they do illustrate that continued progress occurs through a combination of a recognition of the current status and the postulation of new ideas to advance our understanding of irrigation engineering and science. The global food and water challenges will require continued progress from our portion of the scientific community.