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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Pullman, Washington » Plant Germplasm Introduction and Testing Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #324420

Research Project: Management of Plant Genetic Resources and Associated Information

Location: Plant Germplasm Introduction and Testing Research

Title: Adaptation of autumn-sown faba bean germplasm to southeastern Washington

Author
item Landry, Erik
item Coyne, Clarice - Clare
item Mcgee, Rebecca
item Hu, Jinguo

Submitted to: Agronomy Journal
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/30/2015
Publication Date: 11/30/2015
Citation: Landry, E.J., Coyne, C.J., Mcgee, R.J., Hu, J. 2016. Adaptation of autumn-sown faba bean germplasm to southeastern Washington. Agronomy Journal. 108:301–308.

Interpretive Summary: Autumn-sown faba bean has the potential to become a new crop for southeastern Washington as temperatures generally remain above -20°C throughout winter. However, information was lacking on testing of known winter-hardy European cultivars and identification of genotypes with novel sources of winter hardiness that are also adapted to southeastern Washington growing conditions. The objectives of this research were to evaluate the performance of northern European cultivars and breeding lines and to identify adapted winter-hardy genotypes from the USDA-ARS NPGS faba bean collection. Multiple sowing dates were used to further understand the effects of establishment on winter-hardiness and yield of autumn-sown faba bean germplasm in southeastern Washington. A variety trial testing the effects of two sowing dates was conducted for two seasons with 20 northern European breeding lines, or cultivars, and USDA-ARS NPGS sourced germplasm accessions with predetermined winter-hardiness. Winter-hardiness and yield varied depending on location, sowing time, and genotype. Across entries and site years, the mean survival was 65% with a yield of 2,800 kg·ha-1. To realize the potential of autumn-sown faba bean in southeastern Washington, genotypes with earlier maturity than the northern European materials tested will be needed.

Technical Abstract: Information regarding the suitability of autumn-sown faba bean (Vicia faba L.) in southeastern Washington is lacking. Therefore, a variety trial testing the effects of two sowing dates was conducted for two seasons (2011-12 and 2012-13) at three locations, Central Ferry Research Farm (CF), Pomeroy, WA; Spillman Agronomy Farm (SF), Pullman, WA; Whitlow Farm (WF), Pullman, WA with 20 northern European breeding lines, or cultivars, and USDA-ARS NPGS sourced germplasm accessions with predetermined winter-hardiness. Winter-hardiness and yield varied depending on location, timing of sowing, and genotype effects. Survival was greatest at CF where the extreme low air temperature was -6°C, yet multiple entries tolerated an extreme low of -14°C in Pullman. In both years, the second sowing at the CF location improved survival, whereas the first sowing was only beneficial at the Pullman locations when seedlings were established prior to the first hard frost. Providing a longer establishment and cold acclimation period was expected to optimize hardiness and yield potential. However, achieving 2-3 nodes prior to the first hard frost was difficult at dryland managed SF and WF locations where soil moisture was limiting. Across entries and site years, the mean survival was 65% with a yield of 2,800 kg·ha-1. To realize the potential of autumn-sown faba bean in southeastern Washington, genotypes with earlier maturity than the northern European materials tested herein will be needed.