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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Florence, South Carolina » Coastal Plain Soil, Water and Plant Conservation Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #324348

Research Project: Enhancement of Cotton Genetics and Management Systems to Improve Yield, Fiber Quality, and Production Stability

Location: Coastal Plain Soil, Water and Plant Conservation Research

Title: Integrated genomic and phenomic approaches for improving cotton productivity under water deficit stress

Author
item Campbell, Benjamin - Todd
item PARK, WONKEUN - Clemson University
item BOWMAN, MEGAN - Former ARS Employee
item Bauer, Philip
item Scheffler, Brian
item UDALL, JOSH - Brigham Young University
item JONES, DON - Cotton, Inc

Submitted to: Meeting Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/30/2013
Publication Date: 9/20/2013
Citation: Campbell, B.T., Park, W., Bowman, M.J., Bauer, P.J., Scheffler, B.E., Udall, J., Jones, D.C. 2013. Integrated genomic and phenomic approaches for improving cotton productivity under water deficit stress. In: Proceedings of the Interdrought-IV Research conference, September 6-8, Perth, australia. 2013 CDROM.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: In the face of changing climatic conditions, water deficit stress is one of the most challenging agricultural issues limiting sustainable cotton production. To meet the global demand for natural cotton fiber and clothe an ever-growing population, world cotton production systems must increase productivity. Simultaneously, cotton production systems must also improve the structural properties of cotton fiber to meet fiber quality demands of global yarn and textile manufacturers. Our laboratory uses an integrated genomic and phenomic platform to improve cotton productivity under naturally occurring water deficit stress. A series of genomics approaches, including cDNA-AFLP expression profiling, RNAseq transcriptome sequencing, and candidate gene cloning, have been utilized in field based water deficit stress experiments to identify an array of target candidate genes. Also, replicated field trials conducted under both naturally occurring water deficit stress and well-watered versus rainfed experimental conditions, are being used to identify genotypes with novel phenotypes. Results from these studies are being used to develop breeding strategies that capitalize on harnessing untapped genetic variation to improve cotton productivity under water deficit stress.