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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Burns, Oregon » Range and Meadow Forage Management Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #324261

Research Project: Restoring and Managing Great Basin Ecosystems

Location: Range and Meadow Forage Management Research

Title: Presence of native vegetation in crested wheatgrass seedings and the influence of crested wheatgrass on native vetation

Author
item Davies, Kirk
item Nafus, Aleta

Submitted to: Great Basin Native Plant Selection and Increase Project
Publication Type: Government Publication
Publication Acceptance Date: 12/31/2015
Publication Date: 1/1/2016
Citation: Davies, K.W., Nafus, A. 2016. Presence of native vegetation in crested wheatgrass seedings and the influence of crested wheatgrass on native vetation. Great Basin Native Plant Selection and Increase Project.Government Report. 1-3.

Interpretive Summary: Crested wheatgrass has been seeded on millions of hectares across the western US. However, very little is known about the variability of plant community characteristics of areas seeded with crested wheatgrass. We evaluated 121 crested wheatgrass seedings across southeastern Oregon. We found that variability was large with stands ranging from near monocultures of crested wheatgrass to diverse plant communities. Variability in plant community characteristics was highly correlated with soil texture, management, pre-seeding disturbance history, and precipitation in the year following seeding. This information is useful for prioritize areas to restore, predicting the impact of seeding crested wheatgrass, and devising management to increase native plants in crested wheatgrass stands.

Technical Abstract: Crested wheatgrass has been seeded on millions of hectares across the western US. However, very little is known about the variability of plant community characteristics of areas seeded with crested wheatgrass. We evaluated 121 crested wheatgrass seedings across southeastern Oregon. We found that variability was large with stands ranging from near monocultures of crested wheatgrass to diverse plant communities. Variability in plant community characteristics was highly correlated with soil texture, management, pre-seeding disturbance history, and precipitation in the year following seeding. This information is useful for prioritize areas to restore, predicting the impact of seeding crested wheatgrass, and devising management to increase native plants in crested wheatgrass stands.