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ARS Home » Midwest Area » Urbana, Illinois » Soybean/maize Germplasm, Pathology, and Genetics Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #323846

Research Project: IMPROVED RESISTANCE TO SOYBEAN PATHOGENS AND PESTS

Location: Soybean/maize Germplasm, Pathology, and Genetics Research

Title: Organically grown soybean production in the USA: Constraints and management of pathogens and insect pests

Author
item Hartman, Glen
item Pawlowski, Michelle - UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS
item Herman, Theresa - UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS
item Eastburn, Darin - UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS

Submitted to: Agronomy
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/13/2016
Publication Date: 2/23/2016
Citation: Hartman, G.L., Pawlowski, M.L., Herman, T.K., Eastburn, D.M. 2016. Organically grown soybean production in the USA: Constraints and management of pathogens and insect pests. Agronomy. 6(1):16. doi:10.3390/agronomy6010016.

Interpretive Summary: In 2011, the United States harvested soybeans on about 32 million ha. Only a small part of this harvest was from organically grown fields (53 thousand ha). A gradual increase in production of organically grown soybean has occurred over the decades due to increased human consumption of soy products and increased demand for organic soybean meal to produce organic animal products. Diseases and pests in non-organic soybean production are often the same as diseases and pests in organic soybean production. However, the management practices often differ between the two systems. In general, more research has been compiled and utilized in producing non-organic soybean, resulting in higher-yielding cultivars with disease and pest resistance. In addition, more labeled pesticides are available for non-organic production. However, because of the higher value of organically produced soybean seeds, there are other management options that organic growers may use that are not normally used in non-organic production systems. This article provides information on management practices used to reduce the impact of diseases and pests in organically grown soybean. This information is important to scientists and producers interested in research on managing soybean diseases for organic soybean production.

Technical Abstract: Soybean is the most produced and consumed oil seed crop worldwide. In 2013, 226 million metric tons were produced in over 70 countries. Organically produced soybean represented less than 0.1% of total world production. In the USA in 2011, the soybean crop was grown on about 32 million ha with 53 thousand ha certified as organic. A gradual increase in production of organically grown soybean has occurred due to increased human consumption of soy products and increased demand for organic soybean meal to produce organic animal products. The same diseases and pests are often problematic in organic and non-organic soybean production, but management often differs between the two systems. In general, more research has been compiled and utilized in producing non-organic grain-type soybean, resulting in higher-yielding cultivars with disease and pest resistance. In addition, more labeled pesticides are available for non-organic production. However, because of the higher value of organically produced soybean seeds, there are other management options that organic growers can consider and could use that are normally not used in non-organic production systems. This article reviews the management practices used to reduce the impact of diseases and pests in organically grown soybean.