Skip to main content
ARS Home » Plains Area » Fort Collins, Colorado » Center for Agricultural Resources Research » Water Management and Systems Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #323083

Research Project: Spatial Modeling of Agricultural Watersheds: Water and Nutrient Management and Targeted Conservation Effects at Field to Watershed Scales

Location: Water Management and Systems Research

Title: Groundwater and climate change: mitigating the global groundwater crisis and adapting to climate change model

Author
item Gurdak, Jason - San Francisco State University
item Leblanc, Marc - Université D’Avignon Et Des Pays De Vaucluse
item Aureli, Alice - United Nations Educational, Scientific And Cultural Organization (UNESCO)
item Carvalho Resende, Tales - United Nations Educational, Scientific And Cultural Organization (UNESCO)
item Faedo, Giorgio - United Nations Educational, Scientific And Cultural Organization (UNESCO)
item Green, Timothy

Submitted to: UNESCO - International Hydrological Programme
Publication Type: Other
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/4/2015
Publication Date: 12/1/2015
Citation: Gurdak, J.J., Leblanc, M., Aureli, A., Carvalho Resende, T., Faedo, G., Green, T.R. 2015. Groundwater and climate change: mitigating the global groundwater crisis and adapting to climate change model. UNESCO - International Hydrological Programme. http://www.graphicnetwork.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/GRAPHIC_pp20151.pdf.

Interpretive Summary: The United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) International Hydrological Programme (IHP) initiated the Groundwater Resources Assessment under the Pressures of Humanity and Climate Change (GRAPHIC) project in 2004 to improve our understanding of the effects of climate change on global groundwater resources. The Vision of GRAPHIC is to advance sustainable groundwater management considering projected climate change and linked human effects. The corresponding Mission of GRAPHIC is threefold: 1) provide a platform for exchange of information through case studies, thematic working groups, scientific research, and communication; 2) serve the global community through providing scientifically based and policy-relevant recommendations; and 3) use regional and global networks to improve the capacity to manage groundwater resources. GRAPHIC is a collaborative effort and umbrella for international research, education, and outreach. GRAPHIC has international investigations covering major geographical regions, groundwater resource topics, and methods to help advance the combined knowledge needed to address scientific and social aspects of the global groundwater crisis in the context of climate change. GRAPHIC uses a multidisciplinary scientific approach that extends beyond physical, chemical, and biological investigations to include human systems of resource management and governmental policies. GRAPHIC has been divided into subjects, methods, and regions. The subjects encompass (i) groundwater quantity, (ii) quality, and (iii) management aspects. GRAPHIC has regional studies in Africa, Asia and Oceania, Europe, Latin America, and the Caribbean and North America.

Technical Abstract: To better understand the effects of climate change on global groundwater resources, the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) International Hydrological Programme (IHP) initiated the GRAPHIC (Groundwater Resources Assessment under the Pressures of Humanity and Climate Change) project in 2004. The Vision of GRAPHIC is to advance sustainable groundwater management considering projected climate change and linked human effects. The corresponding Mission of GRAPHIC is threefold: 1) provide a platform for exchange of information through case studies, thematic working groups, scientific research, and communication; 2) serve the global community through providing scientifically based and policy-relevant recommendations; and 3) use regional and global networks to improve the capacity to manage groundwater resources. GRAPHIC improves understanding of how groundwater interacts within the global water cycle, supports ecosystems and humankind and, in turn, responds to complex and coupled pressures of human activities and climate change. To achieve these objectives within a global context, GRAPHIC is a collaborative effort and umbrella for international research, education, and outreach. GRAPHIC has international investigations covering major geographical regions, groundwater resource topics, and methods to help advance the combined knowledge needed to address scientific and social aspects of the global groundwater crisis in the context of climate change. GRAPHIC uses a multidisciplinary scientific approach that extends beyond physical, chemical, and biological investigations to include human systems of resource management and governmental policies. GRAPHIC has been divided into subjects, methods, and regions. The subjects encompass (i) groundwater quantity (recharge, discharge, and storage), (ii) quality, and (iii) management aspects. GRAPHIC uses many scientific methods, including analysis of field data, geophysics, geochemistry, paleohydrology, remote sensing (GRACE satellite), and modelling. GRAPHIC has regional studies in Africa, Asia and Oceania, Europe, Latin America, and the Caribbean and North America.