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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Florence, South Carolina » Coastal Plain Soil, Water and Plant Conservation Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #323081

Research Project: Innovative Bioresource Management Technologies for Enhanced Environmental Quality and Value Optimization

Location: Coastal Plain Soil, Water and Plant Conservation Research

Title: Kinetics and energetics of producing animal-manure-based biochar

Author
item Ro, Kyoung

Submitted to: BioEnergy Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/11/2016
Publication Date: 3/30/2016
Citation: Ro, K.S. 2016. Kinetics and energetics of producing animal-manure-based biochar. BioEnergy Research. 9:447-453.

Interpretive Summary: Researchers report that manure-based biochar, the solid char product obtained from heating animal manures without air (i.e., pyrolytic carbonization), has considerable potential both in improving soil quality and reducing water pollution. However, one of major obstacles of obtaining manure-based biochar is its high energy requirement for carbonizing wet animal manures. The kinetics and energetics of pyrolytic carbonization in producing manure-based biochar were reviewed and analyzed. Kinetic analysis of pyrolysis showed that the higher the temperature, the shorter the reaction time that was needed for thermal decomposition and carbonization of animal manure. The kinetic information can assist in producing biochar with a desired biochar characteristics: Biochar with lower volatile matter (VM) content can be produced with higher pyrolysis temperature or longer reaction time. Pyrolysis of wet manures is not energetically sustainable due to high energy needed for drying moisture. However, co-pyrolysis with other high energy density wastes such as agricultural plastic wastes would produce not only energetically-sustainable biochar but surplus energy as well. This could be used for local power generation.

Technical Abstract: Pyrolysis of animal manure produce biochar with multiple beneficial use potentials for improving soil quality and the environment. The kinetics and energetics of pyrolysis in producing manure-based biochar char were reviewed and analyzed. Kinetic analysis of pyrolysis showed that the higher the temperature, the shorter the reaction time was needed for thermal decomposition and carbonization of animal manure. This kinetic information can assist in producing biochar with a desired proximate composition: Biochar with lower volatile matter (VM) content can be produced with either higher pyrolysis temperature or longer reaction time. Energetically, pyrolysis of wet manures is not sustainable due to high energy needed for drying moisture. However, co-pyrolysis with other high energy density wastes such as agricultural plastic wastes would produce not only energetically-sustainable biochar but surplus energy as well. This could be used for local power generation.