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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Corvallis, Oregon » Forage Seed and Cereal Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #322445

Research Project: Disease Modeling and Genetic Approaches to Enhance Wheat and Grass Seed Crop Biosecurity

Location: Forage Seed and Cereal Research

Title: Simple sequence repeat markers that identify Claviceps species and strains

Author
item Gilmore, Barbara - Barb
item Alderman, Stephen
item Knaus, Brian
item Bassil, Nahla
item Martin, Ruth
item Dombrowski, James - Jim
item Dung, J - Oregon State University

Submitted to: Fungal Biology and Biotechnology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/3/2016
Publication Date: 1/15/2016
Citation: Gilmore, B.S., Alderman, S.C., Knaus, B.J., Bassil, N.V., Martin, R.C., Dombrowski, J.E., Dung, J. 2016. Simple sequence repeat markers that identify Claviceps species and strains. Fungal Biology and Biotechnology. 3:1.

Interpretive Summary: Claviceps purpurea, commonly known as ergot, is an important floral pathogen of grasses and cereals. The fungus causes seed yield loss and produces alkaloids toxic to animals. This study was initiated to develop Simple Sequence Repeat (SSRs) markers for rapid identification of C. purpurea strains. Seventy four isolates from multiple hosts were used to evaluate 30 SSR markers. The SSR markers developed in this study will be helpful in defining the population structure and genetics of Claviceps strains and will facilitate the development of ergot resistant germplasm.

Technical Abstract: Claviceps purpurea is a pathogen that infects most members of the Pooideae subfamily and causes ergot, a floral disease in which the ovary is replaced with a sclerotium. This study was initiated to develop Simple Sequence Repeat (SSRs) markers for rapid identification of C. purpurea. SSRs were designed from sequence data stored at the National Center of Biotechnology Information database center. The study consisted of 74 ergot isolates, from four different host species, Lolium perenne, Poa pratensis, Bromus inermis, and Secale cereale plus three additional Claviceps species, C. pusilla, C. paspali and C. fusiformis. Samples were collected from six different counties in Oregon and Washington over a five year period. Thirty-four SSR markers were selected which allowed us to distinguish different isolates from one another based on their molecular fingerprints. Discriminant analysis of principle components was used to identify four isolate groups, CA Group 1, 2, 3, and 4, for subsequent cluster and molecular variance analyses. CA Group 1 consisting of eight isolates from the host species P. pratensis, was separated on the cluster analysis plot from the remaining three groups and this group was later identified as C. humidiphila. The other three groups were distinct from one another, but closely related. These three groups had samples from all four of the host species. These SSRs are simple to use, reliable and allowed clear differentiation of C. humidiphila from C. purpurea. Isolates from the three separate species, C. pusilla, C. paspali and C. fusiformis, also amplified with these markers. The SSR markers developed in this study will be helpful in defining the population structure and genetics of Claviceps strains.