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ARS Home » Midwest Area » Ames, Iowa » Corn Insects and Crop Genetics Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #322283

Research Project: SoyBase and the Legume Clade Database

Location: Corn Insects and Crop Genetics Research

Title: A comprehensive draft genome sequence for lupin (Lupinus angustifolius), an emerging health food: Insights into plant-microbe interactions and legume evolution

Author
item Hane, James - Commonwealth Scientific And Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO)
item Yao, Ming - Beijing Genome Institute
item Kamphuis, Lars - Commonwealth Scientific And Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO)
item Nelson, Matthew - University Of Western Australia
item Atkins, Craig - University Of Western Australia
item Bravo, Armando - Boyce Thompson Institute
item Bringans, Scott - Proteomics International
item Cannon, Steven
item Huang, Wei - Iowa State University
item Cullerne, Darren - Commonwealth Scientific And Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO)
item Foley, Rhonda - Commonwealth Scientific And Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO)
item Garg, Gagan - Commonwealth Scientific And Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO)
item Gao, Ling-ling - Commonwealth Scientific And Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO)
item Harrison, Maria - Boyce Thompson Institute
item Li, Sean - Commonwealth Scientific And Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO)
item Mcgrath, Annette - Commonwealth Scientific And Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO)
item Morahan, Grant - University Of Western Australia
item Taylor, Jen - Commonwealth Scientific And Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO)
item Weller, James - University Of Tasmania
item Jianbo, Jian - Beijing Genome Institute
item Singh, Karam - Commonwealth Scientific And Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO)

Submitted to: Plant Biotechnology Journal
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/20/2016
Publication Date: 8/24/2016
Citation: Hane, J.K., Yao, M., Kamphuis, L.G., Nelson, M.N., Atkins, C.A., Bravo, A., Bringans, S., Cannon, S.B., Huang, W., Cullerne, D., Foley, R., Garg, G., Gao, L., Harrison, M., Li, S., Mcgrath, A., Morahan, G., Taylor, J., Weller, J., Jianbo, J., Singh, K.B. 2016. A comprehensive draft genome sequence for lupin (Lupinus angustifolius), an emerging health food: Insights into plant-microbe interactions and legume evolution. Plant Biotechnology Journal. doi: 10.1111/pbi.12615.

Interpretive Summary: Several lupin species have long been grown for their high-protein seeds. Lupins have similar nutritional characteristics as soybean, with ~40 percent protein content. Lupins also fill somewhat different agricultural niches than soybean, tolerating drier and nutrient-poor soils. An international consortium of researchers, led by the Australian federal research agency (CSIRO) and with key USDA-ARS participation, has sequenced the genome of narrow-leafed lupin (Lupinus angustifolius). This research shows that lupin separated from other crop legumes nearly 55 million years ago. This evolutionary distance means that lupin helps adds diversity to our stable of leguminous crops. The unusual ability of lupins to scavenge phosphorous from degraded soils, and to fix their own nitrogenous fertilizer, make these plants a valuable in cropping systems. The availability of a genome sequence will aid plant breeders in developing new lupin varieties with traits such as improved disease tolerance, yield, and drought resistance.

Technical Abstract: Lupins are important grain legume crops that form a critical part of sustainable farming systems, by reducing the need for fertilizer and providing disease breaks. Narrow-leafed lupin (Lupinus angustifolius L.) is gaining popularity as a human health food, as a non-GM alternative to soybean with the grain being high in protein and dietary fiber, low in starch and gluten free. A comprehensive, draft genome sequence of the narrow-leafed lupin cultivar Tanjil (~610Mb) has been generated and re-sequencing analysis of additional lines has helped develop a dense genetic map. Candidate genes for disease resistance and domestication traits were identified and evidence why lupins are unable to undergo mycorrhizal associations discovered. The genome sequence will significantly accelerate lupin breeding programs, for different lupin crops and help provide valuable insight into legume evolution given the distinct phylogenetic relationship of lupins too other well characterized legumes and their high rate of speciation.