Skip to main content
ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BARC) » Beltsville Agricultural Research Center » Environmental Microbial & Food Safety Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #321682

Research Project: ECOLOGY AND MOLECULAR EPIDEMIOLOGY OF ZOONOTIC BACTERIAL PATHOGENS ASSOCIATED WITH DAIRY FARMS

Location: Environmental Microbial & Food Safety Laboratory

Title: The complete genome sequence and methylome of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Cerro, a frequent dairy cow strain

Author
item Haley, Bradd
item Pirone, Cary - U.s. Food & Drug Administration (FDA)
item Muravanda, Tim - U.s. Food & Drug Administration (FDA)
item Brown, Eric - U.s. Food & Drug Administration (FDA)
item Allard, Marc - U.s. Food & Drug Administration (FDA)
item Van Kessel, Jo Ann
item Karns, Jeffrey

Submitted to: Genome Announcements
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 12/8/2015
Publication Date: 1/28/2016
Citation: Haley, B.J., Pirone, C., Muravanda, T., Brown, E., Allard, M., Van Kessel, J.S., Karns, J.S. 2016. The complete genome sequence and methylome of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Cerro, a frequent dairy cow strain. Genome Announcements. 4:E01350-15.

Interpretive Summary: Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica is a common foodborne pathogen. Dairy animals and their environment are known reservoirs for this pathogen but not all Salmonella serovars, or types, cause disease in the animals. The serovar Cerro is common in dairy animals and generally infected animals do not show clinical signs of infection. The complete genome of a Salmonella Cerro isolate was sequenced and deposited in a public database (GenBank). The sequence will help scientists to understand why this particular Salmonella serovar can persistently inhabit the bovine gut. This information will be useful to other scientists and regulatory agencies.

Technical Abstract: Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Cerro is an infrequent pathogen of humans and other mammals, but is frequently isolated from the hindgut of asymptomatic cattle in the United States. To further understand the genomic determinants of S. Cerro specificity for the bovine hindgut, the genome of isolate CFSAN001588 was fully sequenced and deposited in the GenBank database.