Skip to main content
ARS Home » Northeast Area » Geneva, New York » Grape Genetics Research Unit (GGRU) » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #321563

Research Project: Improving Fruit Quality, Disease Resistance, and Tolerance to Abiotic Stress in Grape

Location: Grape Genetics Research Unit (GGRU)

Title: Rootstocks: diversity, domestication and impacts on shoot phenotypes

Author
item WARSCHEFSKY, EMILY - Florida International University
item BISHOP-VON WETTBERG, ERIC - Florida International University
item CHITWOOD, DANIEL - Danforth Plant Science Center
item FRANK, MARGARET - Danforth Plant Science Center
item KLEIN, LAURA - Missouri Botanical Garden
item Londo, Jason
item MILLER, ALLISON - Missouri Botanical Garden

Submitted to: Trends in Plant Science
Publication Type: Review Article
Publication Acceptance Date: 10/31/2015
Publication Date: 11/15/2015
Citation: Warschefsky, E., Bishop-Von Wettberg, E., Chitwood, D., Frank, M., Klein, L., Londo, J.P., Miller, A. 2015. Rootstocks: diversity, domestication and impacts on shoot phenotypes. Trends in Plant Science. DOI: http//dx.doi.org/10.106/j.tplants.2015.11.008.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Grafting is an ancient agricultural practice that joins the root system (rootstock) of one plant to the shoot system (scion) of another individual. It is most commonly employed in woody perennial crops such as Apples, Grapes, and Citrus species to shorten scion juvenile stage length, facilitate clonal propagation of scions, and manipulate scion phenotype. While recent research has focused on scions, in this review we investigate rootstocks, the lesser-known half of the perennial crop equation. We review natural grafting, grafting in agriculture, rootstock diversity and domestication, and developing areas of rootstock research, including molecular signaling and rootstock microbiomes. With growing interest in perennial crops as valuable components of sustainable agriculture, rootstocks provide one mechanism by which to improve and expand perennial productivity in a range of environmental conditions.