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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Washington, D.C. » National Arboretum » Floral and Nursery Plants Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #321361

Research Project: NEW AND EMERGING VIRAL AND BACTERIAL DISEASES OF ORNAMENTAL PLANTS: DETECTION, IDENTIFICATION, AND CHARACTERIZATION

Location: Floral and Nursery Plants Research

Title: Survey of apple chlorotic leaf spot virus and apple stem grooving virus occurrence in Korea and frequency of mixed infections in apple

Author
item Han, Jae-young - Chungnam National University
item Kim, Jung-kyu - Chungnam National University
item Cheong, Jin-soo - Chungnam National University
item Seo, Eun-young - Chungnam National University
item Park, Chan-hwan - Chungnam National University
item Ju, Hye-kyeong - Chungnam National University
item Cho, In-soook - National Institute Of Horticultural & Herbal Science (NIHHS)
item Gotoh, Takafumi - Kyushu University
item Moon, Jae Sun - University Of Science And Technology Of China
item Hammond, John
item Lim, Hyoun-sub - Chungnam National University

Submitted to: Journal of Faculty of Agriculture
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/19/2015
Publication Date: 10/13/2015
Citation: Han, J., Kim, J., Cheong, J., Seo, E., Park, C., Ju, H., Cho, I., Gotoh, T., Moon, J., Hammond, J., Lim, H. 2015. Survey of apple chlorotic leaf spot virus and apple stem grooving virus occurrence in Korea and frequency of mixed infections in apple. Journal of Faculty of Agriculture. 60:323-329.

Interpretive Summary: Virus infection has adverse effects on yield and quality in many crop types, and virus infections tend to accumulate in vegetatively propagated crops, especially in perennial crops such as apples. The prevalence and distribution of different viruses in apple orchards in Korea is poorly understood; therefore a survey was carried out to determine the occurrence and frequency of two viruses commonly found affecting apple production in other countries. Both Apple stem grooving virus and Apple chlorotic leaf spot virus were detected, and sequences of a portion of the viral genome determined for multiple isolates for each virus. These sequences suggested that there have been multiple introductions of each virus into Korea, from different sources. Because neither virus induces obvious visible symptoms, molecular testing will be important to select healthy plants for future propagation. These results will be of interest to quarantine officials and scientists interested in the production of healthy apple trees.

Technical Abstract: Due to the absence of knowledge of the distribution of Apple stem grooving virus (ASGV) and Apple chlorotic leaf spot virus (ACLSV) in apples in Korea, we carried out a survey for these viruses in Gyeongsang and Chungcheong provinces in 2014. A total of 65 samples were collected and tested by RT-PCR using ASGV and ACLSV specific primers. ASGV was detected in 22 samples, and ACLSV in three samples; two of the samples showed double infection of ASGV and ACLSV. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that Korean ASGV and ACLSV were introduced from other countries. Prevalence of ASGV and ACLSV indicates that virus prevention and control may be poorly managed in orchards. Since fruit trees remain in the orchard for many years and it is not possible to eliminate virus from infected trees, healthy scions and virus-resistant rootstocks must be used for virus control. Because it is difficult to visually distinguish ASGV-infected and ACLSV-infected apple trees from healthy trees, thorough surveys by molecular biology methods must be performed routinely.