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ARS Home » Plains Area » Grand Forks, North Dakota » Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center » Dietary Prevention of Obesity-related Disease Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #321346

Research Project: Food Factors to Prevent Obesity and Related Diseases

Location: Dietary Prevention of Obesity-related Disease Research

Title: Opposing impacts on healthspan and longevity by limiting dietary selenium in Telomere Dysfunctional mice

Author
item Wu, Ryan - University Of Maryland
item Cao, Lei - Mississippi State University
item Mattson, Elliot - University Of Maryland
item Witwer, Kenneth - Johns Hopkins University
item Cao, Jay
item Zeng, Huawei
item He, Xin - University Of Maryland
item Combs, Gerald - Former ARS Employee
item Cheng, Wen-hsing - University Of Maryland

Submitted to: Aging Cell
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/18/2016
Publication Date: 2/1/2017
Publication URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/5832844
Citation: Wu, R.T., Cao, L., Mattson, E., Witwer, K.W., Cao, J.J., Zeng, H., He, X., Combs, G.F., Cheng, W. 2017. Opposing impacts on healthspan and longevity by limiting dietary selenium in Telomere Dysfunctional mice. Aging Cell. 16(1):125-135.

Interpretive Summary: Selenium (Se) is an essential trace element essential for optimal health. We investigated the role of Se in longevity and healthspan in a mouse model of healthy aging in humans with short telomeres. Telomere shortening is associated with aging, mortality and aging-related diseases. We found that while Se deficiency promotes longevity, it worsens age-related degenerations and exacerbates age-dependent metabolic disorders, such as osteoporosis, grey hair, alopecia, cataract, and delayed wound healing. The results from this animal study show that Se at nutritional levels has opposing roles in longevity and healthspan. Therefore, the effects of Se on nutritional genomics, metabolism and aging should be considered in recommending Se intake in the future.

Technical Abstract: Selenium (Se) is an essential trace element essential for optimal health. We investigated the role of Se in longevity and healthspan in a mouse model of healthy aging in humans with short telomeres. Telomere shortening is associated with aging, mortality and aging-related diseases. We found that while Se deficiency promotes longevity, it worsens age-related degenerations and exacerbates age-dependent metabolic disorders, such as osteoporosis, grey hair, alopecia, cataract, and delayed wound healing. The results from this animal study show that Se at nutritional levels has opposing roles in longevity and healthspan. Therefore, the effects of Se on nutritional genomics, metabolism and aging should be considered in recommending Se intake in the future.