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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Mississippi State, Mississippi » Poultry Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #320828

Research Project: Optimizing Heavy Broiler Management and Housing Environment for Sustainable Production

Location: Poultry Research

Title: Development and characterization of a continuous tympanic temperature logging (CTTL) probe for bovine animals

Author
item MAYER, J - Mississippi State University
item DAVIS, J - Mississippi State University
item Purswell, Joseph
item KOURY, E - Mississippi State University
item YOUNAN, N - Mississippi State University
item LARSON, J - Mississippi State University
item Brown Brandl, Tami

Submitted to: Transactions of the ASABE
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 10/31/2015
Publication Date: 2/22/2016
Citation: Mayer, J., Davis, J., Purswell, J.L., Koury, E., Younan, N., Larson, J., Brown-Brandl, T.M. 2016. Development and characterization of a continuous tympanic temperature logging (CTTL) probe for bovine animals. Transactions of the ASABE. 59(2):703-714. https://doi.org/10.13031/trans.59.11367.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.13031/trans.59.11367

Interpretive Summary: Developing a research tool that is low cost, easy to install, and can be implemented in group-housed animals is important to quantify parameters needed to promptly assess animal health and well-being. However, a practical and cost-effective solution for monitoring large numbers of animals in a production setting has not been developed. The objectives were to 1) develop a self-contained and easy to deploy temperature probe capable of recording and storing tympanic temperature (TT) data from group-housed beef cattle; 2) determine the minimum sampling interval needed to measure TT in beef cattle; and 3) quantify differences among the ears (left and right) and vagina (Tv). A two-part device, consisting of a temperature logger housed in a molded foam probe was developed. Periodogram analysis determined a minimum effective sampling interval of 2.5 min was needed to capture the dynamic nature of TT under field conditions. Mean temperatures were different (P < 0.0001): 39.3 °C, 38.5 °C, and 38.4 °C for TV and TT in the right and left ears, respectively. The mean temperature difference between the ears (Left - Right = -0.10 °C) was smaller than the mean difference between the vagina and each ear (Vagina - Left Ear = 0.92 °C; Vagina - Right Ear = 0.83 °C). The variability in the temperature profiles both within and between animals presents difficulty in characterizing, modeling, and subsequent prediction of thermal status. Future research should be directed towards characterizing TT profiles of beef cattle using signal analysis for different phenotypes and growth stages.

Technical Abstract: Developing a research tool that is low cost, easy to install, and can be implemented in group-housed animals is important to quantify parameters needed to promptly assess animal health and well-being. However, a practical and cost-effective solution for monitoring large numbers of animals in a production setting has not been developed. The objectives were to 1) develop a self-contained and easy to deploy temperature probe capable of recording and storing tympanic temperature (TT) data from group-housed beef cattle; 2) determine the minimum sampling interval needed to measure TT in beef cattle; and 3) quantify differences among the ears (left and right) and vagina (Tv). A two-part device, consisting of a temperature logger housed in a molded foam probe was developed. Periodogram analysis determined a minimum effective sampling interval of 2.5 min was needed to capture the dynamic nature of TT under field conditions. Mean temperatures were different (P < 0.0001): 39.3 °C, 38.5 °C, and 38.4 °C for TV and TT in the right and left ears, respectively. The mean temperature difference between the ears (Left - Right = -0.10 °C) was smaller than the mean difference between the vagina and each ear (Vagina - Left Ear = 0.92 °C; Vagina - Right Ear = 0.83 °C). The variability in the temperature profiles both within and between animals presents difficulty in characterizing, modeling, and subsequent prediction of thermal status. Future research should be directed towards characterizing TT profiles of beef cattle using signal analysis for different phenotypes and growth stages.