Skip to main content
ARS Home » Northeast Area » Newark, Delaware » Beneficial Insects Introduction Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #320248

Research Project: Biological Control of Invasive Wood-Boring Insect Pests such as Emerald Ash Borer and Asian Longhorned Beetle

Location: Beneficial Insects Introduction Research

Title: Records of unsuccessful attack by Anoplophora glabripennis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) on broadleaf trees of questionable suitability in Ontario

Author
item Turgeon, Jean
item Jones, Chuck
item Luster, Douglas - Doug
item Orr, Mary
item Scarr, Taylor
item Gasman, Ben

Submitted to: The Canadian Entomologist
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/16/2015
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: The Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) is an invasive woodboring pest that was first discovered in North America in 1996. Discovery of ALB in Ontario, Canada, in 2003 led to the implementation of an eradication program. The plan consisted of removing all trees, whether known to be infested or not, within 400 meters of any infested tree that was considered suitable for development of this woodborer. ALB has some preference for certain species of trees such as maples and poplars. However, full development of ALB to the adult stage was questionable or unknown in many of the different types of trees within the proposed 400-meter limit. We visually inspected over 3,000 such trees annually for 3 years following removal of infested trees. Only one tree showed signs of being attacked by ALB; an ash tree had signs of insect development, but no sign of adult emergence. Prior to that survey, we had found only one other species with questionable suitability, a little leaf linden. That tree had many signs of ALB, but no evidence of full development or adult emergence, suggesting resistance to ALB. Both of these trees were within 200 meters of the most heavily infested Norway maple trees found in that infestation, suggesting that colonization of trees with questionable or unknown suitability might occur mostly where population pressure is high. This information will be used by state and federal regulatory agencies as they develop effective management plans for ALB.

Technical Abstract: Discovery of the non-native Anoplophora glabripennis Motschulsky (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in Ontario, Canada, in 2003 led to the implementation of an eradication program. The plan consisted of removing all infested trees and all trees within 400 m of an infested tree belonging to a genus considered suitable for complete development of this wood-borer; however, many of the trees within that 400 m belonged to genera for which suitability for development of A. glabripennis was questionable or unknown. We visually inspected over 3000 such trees annually for the 3 y following removal of infested trees. All but one tree were un-attacked: an ash (Fraxinus excelsior L. (Oleaceae)) tree had signs of oviposition and early-instar development, but not of adult emergence. Prior to that survey, we had found only one other species with questionable suitability, a little leaf linden, Tilia cordata Mill. (Malvaceae). That tree had many signs of oviposition, but no evidence of full development, suggesting resistance to A. glabripennis. Both these trees were within 200 m of the most heavily-infested maple (Acer platanoides L. (Sapindaceae)) tree found in that infestation suggesting that colonisation of trees with questionable or unknown suitability might occur mostly where population pressure is high.