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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Tifton, Georgia » Crop Genetics and Breeding Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #320243

Research Project: Development of Peanut Germplasm with Improved Yield, Oil Quality, and Tolerance to Biotic and Abiotic Stresses

Location: Crop Genetics and Breeding Research

Title: Global resources of genetic diversity in peanut

Author
item Anglin, Noelle
item UPADHYAYA, H - International Crops Research Institute For Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT) - India
item LIAO, B - Oil Crops Research Institute - China
item Holbrook, Carl - Corley

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: 10/1/2015
Publication Date: 3/15/2016
Citation: Barkley, N.L., Upadhyaya, H.D., Liao, B., Holbrook Jr, C.C. 2016. Global resources of genetic diversity in peanut. In: Stalker, H. T., Wilson, R.F. Peanuts: Genetics, Processing, and Utilization. Academic Press and AOCS Press. pp. 67-109.

Interpretive Summary: Collecting and preserving genetic resources is critical in order to improve agricultural production around the world. Ensuring enough food to provide adequate nutrition for the global population is going to be a hugh challenge for plant breeders going forward as the human populations increases. Famines due to new diseases, drought, and wars have been part of human history; however, they could be mitigated or limited by sharing research findings, new varieties, diversity in the diet, and technology transfer to those in need. As the human population grows more natural environments are lost to urban development often destroying areas in which valuable plant populations are adapted. If these plants aren’t already preserved they will be forever lost. Often the value of a particular plant is unknown initially but can wind up being the sole source of resistance to an important disease such as TSWV. Even though maintaining these collections tend to be costly and labor intensive, they have proven to be valuable for research, breeding programs, and have a direct economic impact to the peanut industry.

Technical Abstract: Collecting and preserving genetic resources is critical in order to improve agricultural production around the world. Ensuring enough food to provide adequate nutrition for the global population is going to be a hugh challenge for plant breeders going forward as the human populations increases. Famines due to new diseases, drought, and wars have been part of human history; however, they could be mitigated or limited by sharing research findings, new varieties, diversity in the diet, and technology transfer to those in need. As the human population grows more natural environments are lost to urban development often destroying areas in which valuable plant populations are adapted. If these plants aren’t already preserved they will be forever lost. Often the value of a particular plant is unknown initially but can wind up being the sole source of resistance to an important disease such as TSWV. Even though maintaining these collections tend to be costly and labor intensive, they have proven to be valuable for research, breeding programs, and have a direct economic impact to the peanut industry.