Skip to main content
ARS Home » Southeast Area » Little Rock, Arkansas » Arkansas Children's Nutrition Center » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #319910

Research Project: Impact of Early Dietary Factors on Child Development and Health

Location: Arkansas Children's Nutrition Center

Title: Resistant starch alters gut microbiota and reduces uremic retention solutes in rats with adenine-induced chronic kidney disease

Author
item KIEFFER, DOROTHY - University Of California
item PICCOLO, BRIAN - Arkansas Children'S Nutrition Research Center (ACNC)
item LIU, S - University Of California
item KHAZAELI, M - University Of California
item NAZERTHERRANNI, S - University Of California
item VAZIRI, N - University Of California
item MARTIN, ROY - Louisiana State University
item ADAMS, SEAN - Arkansas Children'S Nutrition Research Center (ACNC)

Submitted to: Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Conference
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/1/2015
Publication Date: 4/1/2015
Citation: Kieffer, D.A., Piccolo, B.D., Liu, S., Khazaeli, M., Nazertherranni, S.D., Vaziri, N.D., Martin, R.J., Adams, S.H. 2015. Resistant starch alters gut microbiota and reduces uremic retention solutes in rats with adenine-induced chronic kidney disease. Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Conference. 29(1):274.4.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by the reduced ability to void urine, leading to accumulation of waste products in the body. Recently, it has been observed that patients with CKD have an altered gut microbiome. This may in part be due to reduced fiber intake. Patients with CKD are often instructed to limit consumption of mineral-rich foods, such as fruits and vegetables. We hypothesized that supplementation with the fermentable dietary fiber, resistant starch (RS), which is devoid of minerals and comprised solely of glucose granules, would alter the gut microbiota and reduce accumulation of waste products in a CKD-rat model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=9/grp) were fed chow containing 0.7% adenine (w/w) for 1 wk to induce CKD. Adenine forms crystals in kidney tubules leading to occlusion and subsequent retention of uremic solutes. Rats were then placed on a semi-purified low-fiber control diet or 59% RS diet (w/w) for 4 wks. Compared to healthy chow-fed rats, the CKD rats had 65% reduced creatinine clearance; RS significantly improved this by 35% compared to CKD rats. A cecal bacterial survey indicated an increase in Bacteroidetes (by 47%, p<0.001) and decrease in Firmicutes (by 29%, p<0.001) in RS-fed rats. Metabolomics of liver, serum, urine, and cecal contents revealed reductions in many uremic retention solutes; i.e., serum and urine microbial-derived indoxyl-sulfate was decreased (by 36% and 66% vs. CKD rats, p<0.05). These results demonstrate the potential for RS as a dietary treatment for CKD, considering its actions to alter the gut microbiota and reduce accumulation of microbial-derived uremic retention solutes.