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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Albany, California » Western Regional Research Center » Healthy Processed Foods Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #319670

Research Project: New Sustainable Processing Technologies to Produce Healthy, Value-Added Foods from Specialty Crops

Location: Healthy Processed Foods Research

Title: Effect of barrier properties of zein colloidal particles and oil-in-water emulsions on oxidative stability of encapsulated bioactive compounds

Author
item Pan, Yuanjie - University Of California
item Tikekar, Rohan - Drexel University
item Wang, Min - University Of California
item Avena Bustillos, Roberto
item Nitin, Nitin - University Of California

Submitted to: Food Hydrocolloids
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/1/2014
Publication Date: 1/15/2015
Citation: Pan, Y., Tikekar, R.V., Wang, M., Avena-Bustillos, R.D., Nitin, N. 2015. Effect of barrier properties of zein colloidal particles and oil-in-water emulsions on oxidative stability of encapsulated bioactive compounds. Food Hydrocolloids. 43:82-90. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodhyd.2014.05.002.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodhyd.2014.05.002

Interpretive Summary: This study compared the performance of biopolymer particle based formulations with oil-in-water emulsions for maintaining the oxidative stability of encapsulated bioactives. The results of this study demonstrated that zein colloidal particles have significantly higher barrier properties than oil-in-water emulsion in limiting peroxyl radical induced oxidation processes. Consequently, the rate of permeation of peroxyl radicals was significantly lower in zein colloidal particles compared to oil-in-water emulsion. Encapsulated curcumin was more stable in zein colloidal particles compared to curcumin in oil-in-water emulsions. However, neither zein colloidal particles nor oil-in-water emulsions were capable of reducing the rate of permeation of oxygen into the encapsulation core. Consistent with this observation, oxygen induced oxidation of retinol was similar in zein colloidal particles and oil-in-water emulsion. Overall, the results of this study enable rational design and engineering of nanoscale encapsulation systems for extended oxidative stability of bioactives.

Technical Abstract: Oxidation of encapsulated bioactive compounds is a key challenge that limits shelf-life of bioactive containing products. The objectives of this study were to compare differences between the oxidative barrier properties of biopolymer particle based encapsulation system (zein colloidal particles) and oil-in-water emulsions and evaluate the impact of these differences on oxidative stability of encapsulated bioactives. Both zein colloidal particles and oil-in-water emulsions were stabilized by casein protein. The oxidative barrier properties of the selected encapsulation systems were determined by measuring the permeation rate of peroxyl radicals and oxygen across the interface. Peroxyl radical permeation rates were correlated with stability of a model bioactive, curcumin and oxygen permeation rates were correlated with stability of another model bioactive, retinol. Radical permeation rate was significantly higher in oil-in-water emulsions compared to zein colloidal particles, indicating enhanced barrier property of zein colloidal particles against peroxyl radical induced oxidation. Consistent with these results, stability of curcumin encapsulated in zein colloidal particles was significantly higher compared to that in oil-in-water emulsions. Oxygen permeation measurements showed no significant differences in the barrier properties of both encapsulation systems against oxygen permeation. Consistent with these results, the oxidative stability of retinol was similar in both encapsulation systems. The results of this study demonstrate the advantages of biopolymer particle based encapsulation system in limiting free radical induced oxidation of encapsulated bioactives and also demonstrate the ineffectiveness of both encapsulation systems in limiting oxygen permeation.