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ARS Home » Midwest Area » West Lafayette, Indiana » Crop Production and Pest Control Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #319060

Research Project: Identification and Analysis of Host Resistance and Hessian Fly Response in Wheat

Location: Crop Production and Pest Control Research

Title: Effectiveness of genes for Hessian fly (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) resistance in the southeastern United States

Author
item Shukle, Richard
item Cambron, Sue
item Moniem, Hossam - Purdue University
item Schemerhorn, Brandi
item Redding, Julie
item Buntin, David - University Of Georgia
item Flanders, Kathy - Auburn University
item Reisig, Dominic - North Carolina State University
item Mohammadi, Mohsen - Purdue University

Submitted to: Journal of Economic Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/9/2015
Publication Date: 10/14/2015
Citation: Shukle, R.H., Cambron, S.E., Moniem, H.A., Schemerhorn, B.J., Redding, J.R., Buntin, D.G., Flanders, K.L., Reisig, D.D., Mohammadi, M. 2015. Effectiveness of genes for Hessian fly (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) resistance in the southeastern United States. Journal of Economic Entomology. 109(1): 399-405.

Interpretive Summary: Wheat production in the southeastern United States suffers significant annual yield loss due to infestation by Hessian fly. All damage to wheat is due to feeding by the larvae of this insect pest and the most effective control is the use of genetically resistant wheat. While resistant wheat is the most effective control, its use results in the selection of Hessian fly that can overcome the resistant wheat. Thus, Hessian field populations need to be periodically monitored to determine the genes for resistance that will most effectively protect the crop. We have evaluated the effectiveness of 17 resistance genes (called H genes) for protection of wheat from Hessian fly. Results documented that the most effective new genes for Hessian fly resistance in wheat are H28 and H33. These results also document that currently highly effective resistance in wheat to Hessian fly is a limited resource and emphasize the need to identify new sources of resistance. This knowledge is essential for breeders to ensure continued resistance in wheat to the Hessian fly that will benefit wheat producers and consumers with increased yields without increased cost of production.

Technical Abstract: The Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor (Say) (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), is the most important insect pest of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. subsp. aestivum) in the southeastern United States, and the deployment of genetically resistant wheat is the most effective control. However, the use of resistant wheat results in the selection of genotypes of the pest that can overcome formerly resistant wheat. We have evaluated the effectiveness of 17 resistance genes for protection of wheat from Hessian fly infestation in the southeastern United States. Results documented that while 11 of the genes evaluated could provide protection of wheat, the most highly effective genes were H12, H18, H26, H28, and H33. However, H12 and H18 have been reported to be only partially effective in field evaluations, and H26 may be associated with undesirable effects on agronomic quality when introgressed into elite wheat lines. Thus, the most promising new genes for Hessian fly resistance appear to be H28 and H33. These results indicate that identified highly effective resistance in wheat to the Hessian fly is a limited resource and emphasize the need to identify new sources of resistance. Also, we recommend the deployment of resistance in gene pyramids and the development of novel strategies for engineered resistance be considered.