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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Athens, Georgia » U.S. National Poultry Research Center » Bacterial Epidemiology & Antimicrobial Resistance Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #317971

Research Project: Microbial Ecology of Human Pathogens Relative to Poultry Processing

Location: Bacterial Epidemiology & Antimicrobial Resistance Research

Title: Recovery of thermophilic Campylobacter by three sampling methods from classified river sites in Northeast Georgia, USA

Author
item Meinersmann, Richard - Rick
item Berrang, Mark
item Bradshaw, J.k. - Oak Ridge Institute For Science And Education (ORISE)
item Molina, M. - Us Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
item Cosby, Douglas
item Genzlinger, Linda

Submitted to: Campylobacter Helicobacter and Related Organisms International Workshop
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/10/2015
Publication Date: 11/1/2015
Citation: Meinersmann, R.J., Berrang, M.E., Bradshaw, J., Molina, M., Cosby, D.E., Genzlinger, L.L. 2015. Recovery of thermophilic Campylobacter by three sampling methods from classified river sites in Northeast Georgia, USA. Campylobacter Helicobacter and Related Organisms International Workshop. November 1-5, 2015. Rotorua, New Zealand.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: It is not clear how best to sample streams for the detection of Campylobacter which may be introduced from agricultural or community land use. Fifteen sites in the watershed of the South Fork of the Broad River (SFBR) in Northeastern Georgia, USA, were sampled in three seasons. Seven sites were classified as mostly influenced by forest, six sites mostly pasture, and two sites were downstream from waste water pollution control plants (WPCP). Collections were made at or near base-flow rate. Sampling was repeated twice in the fall of 2012 and three times in the spring and fall of 2013 at two or more week intervals for a total of 120 samplings. Free-catch water and sediment grab samples were taken at each sampling; Moore’s swabs were placed for up to three days at most sites. A total of 58 isolates of thermophilic Campylobacter were recovered at least once from all the sites except for one of the forest. Fourteen samplings were positive by two or three methods and 29 samplings were positive by only one method; twice by Moore’s swab and 27 times by free-catch water. Campylobacter was detected at 58% of cattle grazed pastures sites, 30% of forested sites and 81% of WPCP sites. Water grab samples were more efficient than Moore’s swabs or sediment samples for recovery of Campylobacter, which is more likely to be detected in streams near cattle pastures and human communities than in forested land.